KINTSUGI :: Embrace Damage

iPhone Cases & Covers

Model:
$19.00
TorontoSol

Oakville, Canada

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Specifications

  • Material

    Soft flexible case with impact protection. Made with TPU, a durable material made of a mixture of soft silicone and hard plastic
    Protective Lip Weight Thickness
    Yes 26g Midweight 1/16 inch Single Layer

Features

  • Durable flexible case that grips around the edges of your phone
  • Shock absorbent TPU case with anti-fingerprint finish allows full access to device ports
  • Colors are ink printed on the frosted shell surface
  • The design is featured on the back while the edges of the case are semi transparent
  • Try Snap Cases for a lightweight hard case or Tough Cases for an extra durable option
  • Features your chosen design by an independent artist
  • Compatible with Qi-standard wireless charging

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Artist's Description

Embrace your history; embrace the beauty of who you are.

Kintsugi (金継ぎ?) (Japanese: golden joinery) or Kintsukuroi (金繕い?) (Japanese: golden repair) Defined as “to repair with gold”,is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver, or platinum.
As a philosophy it treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something to disguise.

Kintsugi can relate to the Japanese philosophy of “no mind” (無心 mushin?) which encompasses the concepts of non-attachment, acceptance of change and fate as aspects of human life.

“ Not only is there no attempt to hide the damage, but the repair is literally illuminated… a kind of physical expression of the spirit of mushin….Mushin is often literally translated as “no mind,” but carries connotations of fully existing within the moment, of non-attachment, of equanimity amid changing conditions. …The vicissitudes of existence over time, to which all humans are susceptible, could not be clearer than in the breaks, the knocks, and the shattering to which ceramic ware too is subject. This poignancy or aesthetic of existence has been known in Japan as mono no aware, a compassionate sensitivity, or perhaps identification with, [things] outside oneself. ”
— Christy Bartlett, Flickwerk: The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics

Artwork Comments

desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

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