Wassily Kandinsky Painting with red spot (1914).

Floor Pillows

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$48.58
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Joined August 2010

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Sizing Information

Size Perfect for Insert available
Throw Pillow 16 x 16 inch Couch, Bed
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Throw Pillow 20 x 20 inch Couch, Bed
Throw Pillow 24 x 24 inch Couch, Bed, Floor
Throw Pillow 26 x 26 inch Couch, Bed, Floor
Floor Pillow 36 x 36 inch Floor Cover only
Note: Some designs are not available in all sizes.

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Features

  • Vibrant double-sided print floor pillows are a versatile seating or lounging option that will update any room
  • Independent designs, custom printed when you order
  • Durable 100% Spun Polyester cushion cover - fills must be purchased separately for this floor pillow
  • Concealed zip opening for a clean look and easy care

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Artist's Description

Wassily Kandinsky Painting with red spot (1914).

Also other Kandisky’s on Toms site.

Painting with red spot
Wassily Kandinsky
Date: 1914; Moscow, Russian Federation
Style: Abstract Art
Genre: abstract
Media: oil, canvas
Location: Georges Pompidou Center, Paris, France.

Wassily Wassilyevich Kandinsky was a Russian painter and art theorist.

He is credited with painting one of the first recognised purely abstract works.

Born in Moscow, Kandinsky spent his childhood in Odessa, where he graduated at Grekov Odessa Art school. He enrolled at the University of Moscow, studying law and economics. Successful in his profession—he was offered a professorship (chair of Roman Law) at the University of Dorpat—Kandinsky began painting studies (life-drawing, sketching and anatomy) at the age of 30.

In 1896, Kandinsky settled in Munich, studying first at Anton Ažbe’s private school and then at the Academy of Fine Arts. He returned to Moscow in 1914, after the outbreak of World War I. Following the Russian Revolution, Kandinsky “became an insider in the cultural administration of Anatoly Lunacharsky” and helped establish the Museum of the Culture of Painting.

However, by then “his spiritual outlook… was foreign to the argumentative materialism of Soviet society”, and opportunities beckoned in Germany, to which he returned in 1920. There, he taught at the Bauhaus school of art and architecture from 1922 until the Nazis closed it in 1933.

He then moved to France, where he lived for the rest of his life, becoming a French citizen in 1939 and producing some of his most prominent art. He died in Neuilly-sur-Seine in 1944.

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