Hubble Peers into the Storm, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).

Floor Pillows

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$48.58
TOM HILL - Designer

Joined August 2010

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Sizing Information

Size Perfect for Insert available
Throw Pillow 16 x 16 inch Couch, Bed
Throw Pillow 18 x 18 inch Couch, Bed
Throw Pillow 20 x 20 inch Couch, Bed
Throw Pillow 24 x 24 inch Couch, Bed, Floor
Throw Pillow 26 x 26 inch Couch, Bed, Floor
Floor Pillow 36 x 36 inch Floor Cover only
Note: Some designs are not available in all sizes.

We recommend using inserts/fills that are bigger than the covers to ensure a plump finish

Features

  • Vibrant double-sided print floor pillows are a versatile seating or lounging option that will update any room
  • Independent designs, custom printed when you order
  • Durable 100% Spun Polyester cushion cover - fills must be purchased separately for this floor pillow
  • Concealed zip opening for a clean look and easy care

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Artist's Description

Hubble Peers into the Storm, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).

This shot from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows a maelstrom of glowing gas and dark dust within one of the Milky Way’s satellite galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This stormy scene shows a stellar nursery known as N159, an HII region over 150 light-years across. N159 contains many hot young stars.

These stars are emitting intense ultraviolet light, which causes nearby hydrogen gas to glow, and torrential stellar winds, which are carving out ridges, arcs, and filaments from the surrounding material. At the heart of this cosmic cloud lies the Papillon Nebula, a butterfly-shaped region of nebulosity. This small, dense object is classified as a High-Excitation Blob, and is thought to be tightly linked to the early stages of massive star formation.

N159 is located over 160,000 light-years away. It resides just south of the Tarantula Nebula (heic1402), another massive star-forming complex within the LMC. This image comes from Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. The region was previously imaged by Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, which also resolved the Papillon Nebula for the first time. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

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