Crab Nebula, a six-light-year-wide expanding remnant of a star's supernova explosion.

Floor Pillows

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$48.58
TOM HILL - Designer

Joined August 2010

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Sizing Information

Size Perfect for Insert available
Throw Pillow 16 x 16 inch Couch, Bed
Throw Pillow 18 x 18 inch Couch, Bed
Throw Pillow 20 x 20 inch Couch, Bed
Throw Pillow 24 x 24 inch Couch, Bed, Floor
Throw Pillow 26 x 26 inch Couch, Bed, Floor
Floor Pillow 36 x 36 inch Floor Cover only
Note: Some designs are not available in all sizes.

We recommend using inserts/fills that are bigger than the covers to ensure a plump finish

Features

  • Vibrant double-sided print floor pillows are a versatile seating or lounging option that will update any room
  • Independent designs, custom printed when you order
  • Durable 100% Spun Polyester cushion cover - fills must be purchased separately for this floor pillow
  • Concealed zip opening for a clean look and easy care

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Artist's Description

This is a mosaic image, one of the largest ever taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope of the Crab Nebula, a six-light-year-wide expanding remnant of a star’s supernova explosion. Japanese and Chinese astronomers recorded this violent event nearly 1,000 years ago in 1054, as did, almost certainly, Native Americans.

The orange filaments are the tattered remains of the star and consist mostly of hydrogen. The rapidly spinning neutron star embedded in the center of the nebula is the dynamo powering the nebula’s eerie interior bluish glow. The blue light comes from electrons whirling at nearly the speed of light around magnetic field lines from the neutron star. The neutron star, like a lighthouse, ejects twin beams of radiation that appear to pulse 30 times a second due to the neutron star’s rotation. A neutron star is the crushed ultra-dense core of the exploded star.

The Crab Nebula derived its name from its appearance in a drawing made by Irish astronomer Lord Rosse in 1844, using a 36-inch telescope. When viewed by Hubble, as well as by large ground-based telescopes such as the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope, the Crab Nebula takes on a more detailed appearance that yields clues into the spectacular demise of a star, 6,500 light-years away.

The newly composed image was assembled from 24 individual Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 exposures taken in October 1999, January 2000, and December 2000. The colors in the image indicate the different elements that were expelled during the explosion. Blue in the filaments in the outer part of the nebula represents neutral oxygen, green is singly-ionized sulfur, and red indicates doubly-ionized oxygen.

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