Mission Doorway

Photographic Prints

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$7.70
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Sizing Information

Small 8.0" x 10.7"
Medium 12.0" x 16.0"
Large 16.0" x 21.3"
X large 20.0" x 26.7"

Features

  • Superior quality silver halide prints
  • Archival quality Kodak Endura paper
  • Lustre: Professional photo paper with a fine grain pebble texture
  • Metallic: Glossy finish and metallic appearance to create images with exceptional visual interest and depth

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Artist's Description

“Every element has a sound, an original sound;
all those sounds unite like the harmony from harps and zithers.”

“The fiery life of divine wisdom, ignites the beauty of the plains.
It brings sparkle to the waters and burns in the sun, the moon and the stars”.

“The earth which sustains humanity
must not be injured, it must not be destroyed.”

HILDEGARD VON BINGEN

This is Mission San Jose in San Antonio, Texas

Mission San José y San Miguel de Aguayo is a historic Catholic mission in San Antonio, Texas, USA. The mission was named in part for the Marquis de San Miguel de Aguayo, José de Azlor y Virto de Vera. Many buildings on the campus of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas, borrow architectural elements from those found at Mission San José.1

The mission was founded on February 23, 1720, because Mission San Antonio de Valero had become overcrowded shortly after its founding with refugees from the closed East Texas missions. Father Antonio Margil received permission from the governor of Coahuila and Texas, the Marquis de San Miguel de Aguayo, to build a new mission 5 miles (8 km) south of San Antonio de Valero.2 Like San Antonio de Valero, Mission San José served the Coahuiltecan Indians. The first buildings, made of brush, straw, and mud, were quickly replaced by large stone structures, including guest rooms, offices, a dining room, and a pantry. A heavy outer wall was built around the main part of the mission, and rooms for 350 Indians were built into the walls.3

A new church, which is still standing, was constructed in 1768 from local limestone.4 The mission lands were given to its Indians in 1794, and mission activities officially ended in 1824. After that, the buildings were home to soldiers, the homeless, and bandits. It was restored in the 1930s5 and is now part of the San Antonio Missions National Historical Park.

Artwork Comments

desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

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