Parking Meter in Dartmoor

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Small 8.0" x 10.7"
Medium 12.0" x 16.0"
Large 16.0" x 21.4"
X large 20.0" x 26.7"

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  • Superior quality silver halide prints
  • Archival quality Kodak Endura paper
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Artist's Description

“THE DOORS OF WISDOM ARE NEVER SHUT”

Benjamin Franklin

I really enjoyed seeing this trusting way to have a parking meter, where people just put their parking fee in this rock container. It is in Postbridge, on Dartmoor, Devon (England)

the majority of the prehistoric remains on Dartmoor date back to the late Neolithic and early Bronze Age. Indeed, Dartmoor contains the largest concentration of Bronze Age remains in the United Kingdom, which suggests that this was when a larger population moved onto the hills of Dartmoor. The large systems of Bronze Age fields, divided by reaves, cover an area of over 10,000 hectares (39 sq mi) of the lower moors.
The climate at the time was warmer than today, and much of today’s moorland was covered with trees. The prehistoric settlers began clearing the forest, and established the first farming communities. Fire was the main method of clearing land, creating pasture and swidden types of fire-fallow farmland. Areas less suited for farming tended to be burned for livestock grazing. Over the centuries these Neolithic practices greatly expanded the upland moors, and contributed to the acidification of the soil and the accumulation of peat and bogs.

The highly acidic soil has ensured that no organic remains have survived, but the durability of the granite has meant that the remains of buildings, enclosures and monuments have survived well, as have flint tools. It should be noted that a number of remains were “restored” by enthusiastic Victorians and that, in some cases, they have placed their own interpretation on how an area may have looked.

Artwork Comments

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