Laguna Reservation

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Sizing Information

Small 10.7" x 8.0"
Medium 16.0" x 12.0"
Large 21.3" x 16.0"
X large 26.7" x 20.0"

Features

  • Superior quality silver halide prints
  • Archival quality Kodak Endura paper
  • Lustre: Professional photo paper with a fine grain pebble texture
  • Metallic: Glossy finish and metallic appearance to create images with exceptional visual interest and depth

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Artist's Description

“ONE DOES NOT SELL THE LAND
THAT PEOPLE WALK ON ………..”

Crazy Horse, Sept. 23, 1875

Driving through New Mexico, we met two wonderful artists’ from the Laguna Pueblo Native American Tribe who were kind enough to explain some of their culture and history to me as well as describing the Mission San José de Laguna
Their names are Arlene Thomas and Faye Yawea. They also sell and make beautiful jewelry, they allowed me to take photos of them both.

LAGUNA PUEBLO TRIBE

The Laguna Indian Reservation is located in beautiful west central New Mexico. High-desert plains, mesas, rolling foothills, and the mountainous and heavily forested area around Mount Taylor are part of the geographically diverse lands within the Laguna reservation. The reservation encompasses approximately 533,000 acres of land within the counties of Cibola, Valencia, Sandoval, and Bernalillo. The eastern border of the reservation is approximately 10 miles from the Albuquerque city limits and the western boundary is approximately 25 miles east of Grants. Interstate 40 and Old Route 66 run through the heart of Laguna.

Featured in: THE WORLD AS WE SEE IT
Featured in: NEW MEXICO (February 19th, 2011)

I use a LUMIX panasonic point and shoot camera

A people rich in culture, the 7,000-year-old Anasazi are the ancestors of today’s Pueblo Indians. Their culture arose from even more ancient peoples in what is now the American Southwest.

During their long history, the Anasazi evolved from a nomadic to a sedentary culture and existence. At first hunter-gatherers, in time the Anasazi began raising maize and other crops. They also produced skillfully woven baskets.

By a.d. 700, the Anasazi were building pueblos, or villages, along with extraordinary pottery marked by elaborate black-on-white designs. Their villages, built at the top of mesas or in hollowed-out natural caves at the base of canyons, included multiple-room dwellings and complex apartment structures of stone or adobe masonry.

Despite their successful culture, the Anasazi way of life declined in the 1300s, probably because of drought and intertribal warfare.

Today, Pueblo descendants of the Anasazi still live largely traditional lives in the American Southwest, farming the land, weaving baskets, and making pottery.

Artwork Comments

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