Canon Printing with Mac OSX 10.6.x

As some of you already know, I have recently migrated from the Windows platform to the Intel-based Mac platform with the OSX Snow Leopard operating system.

My Canon printer, an IX4000 A3 inkjet, which has been working fantastically (well, within the limits imposed by the fact that it’s not a top-of-the-range Epson costing a bloody fortune) with Windows Vista (!!) has suddenly become deficient in an important feature when using the Mac driver: its colour management cannot be disabled.

So why is this so important, I hear you ask .. and what the hell is colour management anyway?

Colour management, my dear chaps and chappettes, is the process which avoids people like us coming out with the well-known phrase “But these look nothing like what I see on the screen” when we see prints of our images. Briefly, colour management involves calibrating our monitors to ensure that what WE see on screen is exactly the same as what our mates see on their screens if we email them our images (or post them on RB), and calibrating (or “profiling”, as smart arses like me like to call it to make out that we’re whizz kids!) our printers so that the print of an image is as close as possible, in colour rendition, to the screen image.

The use of a printer profiling device involves the scanning of one or more printed test charts, generated by the device software, to allow the device to get a clear idea of the printer’s gamut (i.e. the range of colours which it can print) on the particular printing paper chosen (bearing in mind that each type of paper requires a different profile). In order that the charts provide an ACCURATE representation of the printer’s gamut, it is ESSENTIAL that they are printed WITHOUT any color adjustment by the printer. This requires that the printer’s color management be disabled via the driver options.

The problem I face is that, whilst the Windows version of the IX4000 driver had an option to do just this, the Mac OSX version does not. Exactly why this should be is of no concern to me (although I strongly suspect it has to do with Canon’s total inability to get to grips with the 64-bit Snow Leopard system) – all I’m concerned with is the fact that I can’t profile the printer for different papers .. which makes it about as much use as a kaleidoscope to Stevie Wonder if I want to change paper from the types I’ve already profiled!

I am currently engaged in a “discussion” with Canon Customer Support (carried out, rather predictably, with some fairly direct, but nevertheless courteous, language on my part) whereby I’m pointing out that (a) I’m not going to be the meat in a blame-game sandwich between Canon and Apple as to whose responsibility it is to sort things out (Canon is the name on the printer, not Apple – you get the gist) and that (b) a failure to sort it out places them in something of a ticklish position in respect of such items of consumer protection legislation as the Sale of Goods Act 1979 and the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008, given that the printer is still being advertised and marketed (on the basis, it almost goes without saying, of a plethora of highly inflated claims of quality and capability) in the UK (and elsewhere, for that matter).

If anyone is interested in the progress of this internecine warfare, or who thinks they might be able to provide a solution or workaround, leave an appropriate comment and I’ll update you all on the progress by means of new journal entries.

Journal Comments

  • Lois  Bryan
  • Karl Williams
  • Lois  Bryan
  • Barbara  Jones ~ PhotosEcosse
  • Barbara  Jones ~ PhotosEcosse
  • Barbara  Jones ~ PhotosEcosse
  • Karl Williams
  • Lois  Bryan
  • Karl Williams