Inchcolm Island and Abbey

Paul  Gibb

Dunfermline, United Kingdom

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Taken on 16/10/10 from the rier forth looking across to Inchcolm Island and Abbey. Using my Canon eos T1i rebel (500d) dslr. With a shutter speed of 1/100 and aperture setting of 10 and iso 100. I sharpened up the Abbey in Photoshop cs4.
The Abbey was first used as a priory by Augustinian canons regular, becoming a full abbey in 1235. The island was attacked by the English from 1296 onwards, and the Abbey was abandoned after the Scottish Reformation in 1560. It has since been used for defensive purposes, as it is situated in a strategically important position in the middle of the Firth of Forth. A medieval inscription carved above the Abbey’s entrance reads: Stet domus haec donec fluctus formica marinos ebibat, et totum testudo permabulet orbem ‘May this house stand until an ant drains the flowing sea, and a tortoise walks around the whole world’.
Inchcolm Abbey has the most complete surviving remains of any Scottish monastic house. The cloisters, chapter house, warming house, and refectory are all complete, and most of the remaining claustral buildings survive in a largely complete state. The least well-preserved part of the complex is the monastic church. The ruins are cared for by Historic Scotland, which also maintains a visitor centre near the landing pier (entrance charge; ferry from South Queensferry).(Abbey Info from Wickepedia)
View More of my photographs at PAUL GIBB PHOTOGRAPHY

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