Thinking in Pictures

When the mind is thinking it is talking to itself. (Plato)

According to the Wikipedia online ”Picture thinking, visual thinking or visual/spatial learning is the common phenomenon of thinking through visual processing. Thinking in pictures, is one of a number of other recognized forms of non-verbal thought such as kinesthetic, musical and mathematical thinking. Multiple thinking and learning styles, including visual, kinesthetic, musical, mathematical and verbal thinking styles are a common part of many current teacher training courses.

Research by Child Development Theorist Linda Kreger Silverman suggests that less than 30% of the population strongly uses visual/spatial thinking, another 45% uses both visual/spatial thinking and thinking in the form of words, and 25% thinks exclusively in words. According to Kreger Silverman, of the 30% of the general population who use visual/spatial thinking, only a small percentage would use this style over and above all other forms of thinking, and can be said to be ‘true’ “picture thinkers”.

While visual thinking and visual learners are not synonymous, those who think in pictures have generally claimed to be best at visual learning. Also, while preferred learning and thinking styles may differ from person to person, precluding perceptual or neurological damage or deficits diminishing the use of some types of thinking, most people (visual thinkers included) will usually employ some range of diverse thinking and learning styles whether they are conscious of the differences or not. (Wikipedia)

I found this site called ‘Visuwords’ while surfing the net and it is a fun site indeed! Here is how they describe themselves:

”Visuwords™ online graphical dictionary — Look up words to find their meanings and associations with other words and concepts. Produce diagrams reminiscent of a neural net.

Learn how words associate. Enter words into the search box to look them up or double-click a node to expand the tree. Click and drag the background to pan around and use the mouse wheel to zoom. Hover over nodes to see the definition and click and drag individual nodes to move them around to help clarify connections.

  • It’s a dictionary! It’s a thesaurus!
  • Great for writers, journalists, students, teachers, and artists.
  • The online dictionary is available wherever there’s an internet connection.
  • No membership required.

Visuwords™ uses Princeton University’s WordNet, an opensource database built by University students and language researchers. Combined with a visualization tool and user interface built from a combination of modern web technologies, Visuwords™ is available as a free resource to all patrons of the web.” (The Visuwords online site)

As I am rather fond of words — ye may have gathered that already, eh?! — I wanted to see the how the site works, so I put a couple of words just to see what comes up with a couple of words and it worked brilliantly!

Words and pictures can work together to communicate more powerfully than either alone. (William Albert Allard)

I do fully agree with him! Keep so well and safe. Rii xx

Handy sites for further reading:

Visual-Spatial Resource

What’s YOUR Learning Style? ’Quizz

The Shakespeare Organization online site

© Riihele. All rights reserved

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