Good Night Charlestown

Metal Prints

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$72.50
Richard Horsfield

St Austell, United Kingdom

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Sizing Information

X small 17.9" x 12.0"
Small 23.9" x 16.0"
Medium 29.9" x 20.0"
Large 35.8" x 24.0"
X large 39.8" x 26.7"

Features

  • Available in both High Gloss and Satin
  • Gently rounded corners
  • Cleanable surface
  • Lightweight aluminium is literally infused with the chosen artwork

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Artist's Description

Night-time at Charlestown Harbour, Cornwall.

The harbour village of Charlestown was a Georgian ‘new town’, a port development planned by local landowner Charles Rashleigh (after whom it was named) and built between 1790 and 1810 for the export of copper and china clay.

Throughout the nineteenth century the little dock was packed with ships and the harbourside sheds and warehouses thronged with complementary businesses: boatbuilding, ropemaking, brickworks, lime burning, net houses, bark houses and pilchard curing.

Charlestown harbour and two beaches on either side of the harbour entrance are owned by Square Sail, a company who own and operate a fleet of tall ships, one or two of which can often be found at anchor in the harbour, and are sometimes open for tours. The best-known tall ship to regularly visit the port was the Maria Asumpta, launched in 1858 and was the world’s oldest working square-rigger.
The Maria Asumpta ran aground May 1995 and broke up on the north Cornish coast, with the loss of three of her sixteen crew.

Charlestown harbour has several times been transformed into historic ports like Bristol for film and television productions.
For example, it has starred in an adaptation of Jane Austen’s “Persuasion” and films such as “The Three Musketeers” (1993 version), The Voyage of Charles Darwin", the “Onedin Line” and “Poldark” have all had some scenes shot here.

During the 19th century the ancillary businesses for the port developed such as boatbuilding, ropemaking, brickworks, lime burning, net houses, bark houses and pilchard curing.

The harbour continues today as a working port and a small amount of china clay is still exported, which has stopped it becoming a “tourist village”. It has has largely escaped ‘development’ and so has retained its original character.
The harbour also is the home port for a number of “tall ships” which are used in film productions all over the world,most recently in Disneys Alice In Wonderland, directed by Tim Burton.

This image is a bracketed exposure.

Artwork Comments

  • winterwonderz
  • Richard Horsfield
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