Be Humble...Get Connected...It's Vital to your Success...

The article below is by Brian Sherwin, Regular contributing writer for FineArtViews, a newsletter that is about art and Fine Living. Brian Sherwin is an art critic, blogger, curator, artist and writer based near Chicago, Illinois…FAV allows subscribers to share information with others..

  • In this age of fast-paced— and ever-growing— social connection, you never know who may end up viewing your art after someone spreads a link to your artwork on Facebook, Twitter, or other social media sites.
    When someone who appears to be of little importance posts a link to your website or blog, the gesture may become viral….suddenly his or her friends spread the link further and one of those friends happens to be friends with someone who shares the link with her friends… and one of the friends on her list ends up being an art buyer, writer, or someone of influence within the art world who ‘gets’ what you are doing and contacts you directly.
    My point… don’t take anyone for granted…you never know the connections…or the chain of connections, they may have. In this ‘sea’ of discovery it is better to be grateful than to be an online art snob floating alone
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  • We live in an age of rampant creative discovery that is fuelled by the Internet. The Internet has provided ‘fertile waters’ that artists from the past only dreamed of… today there are many routes to take in this ‘sea’ of discovery.
    An artist who desires to be discovered by potential art buyers must be prepared to climb a ladder of opportunities. Each step brings one closer to some form of success… be it financial or simply that of influence.
    You might be asking yourself, “Where are these opportunities? Where is this ‘wave’ of change?”…to that I say… you need only log on to Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media driven website. These opportunities are your online friends, followers, and fans…individuals who can cause influential ‘ripples’ and ‘waves’ within the ‘waters’ of social media
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  • I view every online ‘friend’ that I have as a potential opportunity for exposure. Thus, it is my opinion that artists should hold that same position.
    Everyone you come in contact with online can be a potential opportunity for furthering your visual message…all it takes is for the individual to strike a few keys in front of them and your audience and influence is widened.
    The importance of realizing, and appreciating, these connected opportunities should be a vital aspect of your online art marketing endeavours.
    Don’t travel these ‘waters’ alone when there are individuals who are more than willing to help you on your journey
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  • If you want people to help introduce your website, or other aspects of your online presence, to others you had best appreciate their efforts and show that gratitude with how you conduct yourself online, post a ‘thank you’ to your fans on Facebook, reciprocate a re-tweet if someone introduces you to their followers on Twitter, show your appreciation with a comment on Live journal if someone mentions you, and so on.
    Small actions can lead to big rewards…being humble can be a way to further your exposure without cost. Being humble can help attract individuals who are willing to help you on your journey
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  • Be humble…understand that while your art may be great, it takes online admirers to make it a viral sensation online. You can’t create those ‘ripples’ and ‘waves’ on your own. That said, people are more apt to help ‘spread the waves’ if you treat them with appreciation and respect.
    With that in mind, being an online art snob is the extreme opposite of being humble.
    Online art snobs, in my opinion, are artists who fail to show appreciation to those who admire their artwork online…they never offer a public “thank you” or respond to feedback and praise… they don’t respect friends, followers, or fans who take time out of their day to show appreciation.
    They ignore the ‘ripples’ and ‘waves’ surrounding them. Online art snobs focus on themselves…and miss out on opportunities
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  • An online art snob is easy to spot, and easy to ignore if fellow ‘travellers’ have little patience for constant displays of arrogance. Ego trips are to be expected from time to time, but a pure online art snob places arrogance at the forefront of his or her online activity.
    Thus it goes without saying that online art snobs are always one ‘block’ or ‘removal’ away from severing their ties with a potential opportunity no matter how great their artwork happens to be. That said, the online art snob won’t realize this unless he or she steps back to reflect on how he or she conducts himself or herself online…after all, he or she is too focused keeping his or her own boat afloat
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  • In closing, the problem with being an online art snob…keeping ones own boat afloat… is that, in time, the artist will discover that he or she is floating in calm waters… alone… or at least far from those who would have otherwise helped the artist travel within this digital sea of discovery.
    Ask yourself, “How have I appreciated those who enjoy my art today?”…it only takes a few seconds to let everyone who is focusing on your art know that you have placed some focus on them. It is important for every artist to take notice of the surrounding social media ‘ripples’, and help create ‘waves’ by showing appreciation, less he or she be caught in a ’dead calm
    ’…..Brian Sherwin
  • PS: Some words of caution for online friends, followers, and fans! Don’t assume that an artist is an online art snob just because he or she has failed to reply to you. Keep in mind that some artists receive hundreds of emails and social media messages per day. In other words, don’t confuse being swamped, with online art snobbery.
    Look at the details… look at what the individuals tends to post. Give the artist the benefit of the doubt if he or she fails to respond in a timely manner, unless his or her online activity makes it obvious that he or she simply takes being connected with art admirers for granted
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I post on Twitter (paintability) and less frequently on Face Book..I thank each and every person who comments on my work, but occasionally one or two might slip by me…
I think it is very important to acknowledge the fact that someone has taken the time to comment on my work, but more than that I enjoy the connections with people…sitting at my desk typing away, it often feels like I am talking to someone right beside me…like right now…
I love getting feedback on articles I post as it means it was worth spending the time doing the research…all that being said I do appreciate that some people are incredibly busy and it may take some time to respond to a comment on their art work

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