We both came aged about 12. We both became teachers. (At Mascot P.S..)

Another group of Japanese students, from Sydney University was doing a tour of some locations, in Sydney’s outer western suburbs, where something could be learnt about the ethnic input into the Australian community. The Dutch Shop, ( " ‘tWinkeltje’ " ) was, once again part of that excursion.
It was Wednesday, 29 December, and as, now, the chairman of the D.A.C.C., I felt responsible for welcoming them to the section of Holland House, behind the Dutch Shop, where the Dutch Australian Cultural Centre is located.
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With that ‘duty’ on my mind, I opened up the D.A.C.C., and settled down to play my piano accordion, wondering what I could tell them, when they’d come at 1:15 p.m…
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Two ladies walked in. They’d spoken to the previous chairman, now treasurer of the D.A.C.C., and believed that we might be interested in “The Lost Sister of Groningen”, as it is truly one of the many “Dutch Immigration Experiences” worth telling.
I often quote the title of a chapter in the book, ‘The Dutch in Australia’, by Dr Edward Duyker, which says: “If I may boast……” and mentions a number of Dutch-born immigrants to Australia, who have made a success of their lives here.
At the moment, I’m thoroughly enjoying, getting to know: The Lost Sister of Groningen. as, while my migration experiences would rate as 30% as difficult as Anneke’s, there are so many experiences and locations that I can identify with!
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The visit from the students was a brief and pleasant interlude. Turned out that it was so lucky that I’d brought my cameras, for what turned out to be the highlight of the day:
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Have you seen this:…….

Journal Comments

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