O.C.D.

It was the last day of school. The temperature was souring at 40.C, there wasn’t a breath of wind in site. When all of a sudden I got the biggest, stickiest, hug from behind, “Hi mummy”, my baby girl said, just finishing her first year of primary and full of excitement, because she had six whole weeks at home. Then came my eldest daughter, a little sad from saying her good-byes to her friends she may not see again, who was entering into a new and exciting next phase of her life, high school. Last but not least, as always, my little man who had just finished year five, “Where are we going?” he asked “I thought, because I’m so proud of you guys, I’ll take you to get an ice-cream”. “Yeahhh!” they all yelled.

The ten minute trip there was so hot because the air-conditioner wasn’t working, but was well worth the trip Then all of a sudden my eldest yelled, “I forgot my file!” So instead of enjoying our ice- creams in the cool, we trekked back to the school in hopes that her teacher was still there.

I parked right up near the steps to her classroom and they all got out to look for the teacher, my little girl came running back looking worried. “What’s wrong?” I yelled, as she was as white as a ghost, “I don’t feel well” she answered then started making this really awful noise like she was trying to push out a breath. She fell to the ground, her eyes rolling into the back of her head. She was frightened because she was semi-conscious but couldn’t move or open her eyes. She was having a seizure, something we have had to live with since she was two, but still very terrifying to see. I went straight into Mum mode, making sure she didn’t hurt herself and looking so in control, but shaking inside, as if I was jelly. The teacher was young, lovely, just out of university, she panicked and ran off saying she was getting the headmaster. Then I turned to my son who was crying softly and twiddling his fingers, he said, “Is she going to die Mum?” You see my other two children had never seen her have a seizure before. Now I was trying to make sure my little girl was fine as well as re-assure my little boy that everything was going to be alright. The headmaster asked if I needed an ambulance? Answering “no” he offered to drive us home in our car while I held my little girl, grateful I answered “Yes”.

About an hour she came good, was a little drowsy, but fine, little did we know that ‘ In The Moment’ something triggered in my little boys brain and from that day forward he started to suffer from O.C.D. (obsessive compulsive disorder), which has changed our lives forever.

O.C.D.

NellieAustin

Joined January 2008

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