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Austin, United States

I have spent most of my career as a French professor and a research librarian, and have been reinventing myself as a writer. I’m...

The Texas Capitol and Continuing Abortion Testimonies

Up at the Capitol today, there were what appeared to be an equal number of blues and oranges, orange t- shirts representing the abortion lobby and blue t-shirts representing the lobby for life. It was a very interesting process to witness. The Senate is taking testimony on the abortion bill this week. Last week was the House of Representatives, who sent the bill along to the Senate. There was quite a line to get up to the registration desk, but I was not testifying. One thing that struck me was the often tawdry character to the abortion provocateurs, with coathangers braided into their hair, or hitched onto their backs. And indeed, I did ascertain that the abortion lobby DID hire activisits. They advertised on Craig’s List. Each activist hired receives a $1,200 stipend for the month! That is an awful lot of money when you observe how many were there! Abortion is a lucrative business…if you don’t mind the negative spiritual aspects.

So the long and short of it is that abortion lobbyists are not standing up for Texas women. They’re standing up for Planned Parenthood and abortion providers. I did sit and watch a bit of testimony, given by an abortion provider. She was very factual, but you could see she was emotional about the possibility of losing her practice since she could not get a hospital affiliation.

By this point it was getting close to Mass time, so I walked on over to church. By the time Mass started, the whole church was a sea of blue t-shirts. In the prayers before Mass, everyone was very vocal, and all through Mass as well, the active prayers of the heart. You could feel the petitions being raised to heaven. It was quite beautiful. Today’s homilist did remark that we should not be too into the accoutrements to our life of faith and prayer. He may have been a bit put off by the large placards some people were wearing. I observed one woman wearing a placard of Our Lady of Guadalupe over her blue t-shirt, and some others with various signs, though I didn’t see anything wrong with that. He may not have noticed that placards were very common on the Capitol grounds. I didn’t carry one though. There is enough bling on this blue t-shirt. I wore a little silver cross along the neckline bling on my shirt. Too much bling? I don’t know. I didn’t have a blue t-shirt, so I had stopped on my way home Sunday and bought the cheapest one I could find. it just happened to have bling. I did not see that as a big deal. I felt that it pointed to the sparkling things of heaven and helped us to understand our true goal.

What I DO find offensive are those activists who go up to the Capitol adorned in coathangers. Has anyone ever heard of planning ahead? We call it contraceptives. If you’re going to fool around, at least do something that will prevent conception! That way, you won’t be killing another human being afterwards, or poking holes in yourself with a coathanger, and for what purpose? Then you want us to feel sorry for you instead of the child killed! Think ahead. That’s all I’m saying. I knew someone who bled to death in the abortionist’s office after her abortion, while he ate his lunch. I COULD say more, but at this point, I won’t. In any case, you should know before five months of pregnancy whether or not you will carry that child to term. By five months, you are causing that child such horrible pain! We’re more caring for our dogs, aren’t we?

I came home very thoughtful after this day downtown. Women fearful of being “trapped” in a pregnancy. But you’re not. People will help you and you can give the baby up for adoption if you decide not to keep her. On the other hand, the true brutal deaths of millions of unborn children. And in the middle, some ridiculous activists with coathangers. Each group registers on our souls in a different sad way. Has to be a difficult day for lawmakers. It was difficult for me. I sympathize.

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