Frozen Twin Rose Hips .. wild roses

MaeBelle

White Fox, Canada

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Artist's Description

British Columbia Outdoor Wilderness GuideWild Rose
(Rosa acicularis)
a.k.a. prickly rose
Wild Rose’s scientific name ‘acicularis’ means ‘prickly’.
This shrub, which can grow up to 15 metres tall, is famous for its prickly stems with their beautiful pale pink flowers and nutritious ‘rosehips’


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LEAVES:
- the leaves of the Wild Rose are divided into 5 to 7 small sawtoothed or doubly toothed leaflets
- they can be slightly hairy underneath
FLOWERS:
- Wild Rose flowers are large, pink and fragrant
- one flower grows at the end of each of the side branches
- turn into bright red seed pods or hips
FRUIT:
- scarlet or bright red seed bods with a pear shape
- The fruit of the Wild Rose is called ‘hips’ or ‘rosehips’
- can be up to an inch in diameter
- stay on the bush all winter
HABITAT:
- Wild Roses grow in low to medium elevations
- Wild Roses are found through most of British Columbia ,Alberta and Saskatchewan
- Wild Roses appear in clearings, open forests, rocky slopes
FASCINATING FACTS:
- while the floral emblem of Alberta, Wild Roses grow profusely in BC too
- the Wild Rose is very similar to the wood rose
- the rosehips, which have an applelike flavour, are very high in vitamin C (a better source than orange juice)
- popular food for people and wildlife; fruit, stem and foliage are all eaten by wildlife, people use the young shoots, fruit, stems, flowers and leaves
- the rosehips can be made into jams, syrups and jellies (extremely popular in Europe); The hips are best picked immediately after the first frost. Open a few to be sure the plant is not infested with worms or bugs. (usually not the case, but can happen)
- tea can be made from the Wild Rose petals, leaves and even the roots; and appealing ‘julep’ can be made from soaking fresh petals with an equal amount of cool water, then adding lemon juice and honey
- native peoples ate the rind of the rosehips and left the seeds
- the cambium from the roots was prepared by soaking and boiling and then made into an ointment for sore eyes
- arrows have been made from rose wood.

Photo taken in NE Central Sask,Canada, out in the bush.
Panasonic Lumix FZ18
focus blurred behind rose hips, Experimenting with focus change
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Artwork Comments

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