Opiliones

Laura Puglia

Rescue, United States

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File name IMG_8867.JPG
File Size 8.8MB
Camera Model Canon EOS 70D
Firmware Firmware Version 1.1.1
Shooting Date/Time 6/17/2015 11:53:42 AM
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Shooting Mode Aperture-Priority AE
Tv(Shutter Speed) 1/500
Av(Aperture Value) 11
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ISO Speed 4000
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15 Fascinating Facts About Daddy Longlegs
14.6K Share submit to reddit
Erin McCarthy
filed under: Animals, Lists

LIKE US ON FACEBOOKMarcel Zurreck via Wikimedia Commons
Being a curious person can be a double-edged sword. On one hand, you learn so much! On the other, you sometimes find yourself looking up arachnids right before bedtime, as I did earlier this month. When my search turned up some really interesting information on daddy longlegs, I had to know more—so I called Ron Clouse, who has been studying the DNA and lineages of these often misunderstood arachnids for a decade. “I do everything from going into the field and collecting them to analyzing the data and doing the papers and all the lab tests in between,” he says. Here are a few fascinating facts he told us about daddy longlegs—which I now find pretty cool.

1. THEY’RE NOT SPIDERS…

Luis Fernández García via Wikimedia Commons
Yes, they’re arachnids, but they’re actually more closely related to scorpions than they are to spiders. They don’t produce silk, have just one pair of eyes, and have a fused body (unlike spiders, which have a narrow “waist” between their front and rear).

2. …AND THEY’RE NOT VENOMOUS.

That thing you heard at summer camp about daddy longlegs being the most poisonous creature in the world, but with fangs too weak to bite you? Not true. They don’t even have fangs, and they can’t make venom, either. According to Clouse, the rumor might have gotten started during “the retelling by an American tabloid of a study in Australia on the venom of a daddy longlegs there; the problem is that in Australia, ‘daddy longlegs’ refers to a type of spider,” also known as the cellar spider. And, if that’s not confusing enough, there’s another creature that sometimes goes by the name daddy longlegs: The crane fly.

3. THEY’RE VERY, VERY OLD.

Academdia.edu

“We know from a very well preserved fossil of a daddy longlegs from Scotland that they are at least 400 million years old,” Clouse says. “This fossil actually looks a lot like the long-legged species we see today. It is believed daddy longlegs split off from scorpions, which were becoming terrestrial about 435 million years ago. To put this in perspective, this is about 200 million years before dinosaurs appeared, which were only around for about 165 million years.”

4. THEY HAVE A FEW OTHER NAMES.

In North America, the reason for at least part of their name is pretty obvious—the species we see most frequently have very long, thin legs. But there are different names for them around the world. “In other regions, their common names reflect different attributes found in the species common to those areas," Clouse says. "So, the large, short-legged forms in South America are often referred to by their pungent odors. In Europe, terms like ‘harvestmen’ and ‘shepherd spiders’—and even their scientific name, Opiliones—refer to them as being associated with good pasture, harvest season, or perhaps even their resemblance to shepherds on stilts or the shape of a scythe.”

5. THEY’RE ALL OVER THE WORLD.

These arachnids can be found on every continent but Antarctica. “They’re usually found in humid areas, such as under rocks, in leaf litter, and inside caves,” Clouse says. “They are most diverse in tropical areas, where the moist climate and thick foliage allow them to live in lots of places. Different regions of the world have their own particular daddy longlegs, and some of the most common ones are small and out of sight in the leaf litter on the forest floor. Even here in the U.S. we have some tiny ones in the leaf litter that the average person never sees.”

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