British Motor Corporation (BMC) Rosette

iPhone Cases & Covers

Model:
$25.00
JustBritish

Joined February 2015

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Specifications

  • Material

    Slim fitting one-piece clip-on case
    Protective Lip Weight Thickness
    Yes 15g Lightweight 3/64 inch Single Layer

Features

  • One-piece, clip-on protective case that’s slim and lightweight
  • Impact resistant polycarbonate shell allows full access to device ports
  • Super-bright colors embedded directly into the case
  • Minimal impact on overall device size, for extra protection, try Tough Cases
  • Compatible with Qi-standard wireless charging

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Artist's Description

The logo of BMC, the British Motor Corporation. The British Motor Corporation Limited was a UK-based vehicle manufacturer, formed in early 1952 to give effect to an agreed merger of the Morris and Austin businesses. BMC acquired the shares in Morris Motors and the Austin Motor Company.

BMC was the largest British car company of its day, with (in 1952) 39 per cent of British output, producing a wide range of cars under brand names including Austin, Morris, MG, Austin-Healey, Riley and Wolseley as well as commercial vehicles and agricultural tractors. The first chairman was Lord Nuffield (William Morris) but he was replaced at the end of 1952 by Austin’s Leonard Lord who continued in that role until his 65th birthday in 1961 but handing over, in theory at least, the managing director responsibilities to his deputy George Harriman in 1956.

BMC’s headquarters were at the Austin plant at Longbridge, near Birmingham and Austin was the dominant partner in the group mainly because of the chairman. The use of Morris engine designs was dropped within three years and all new car designs were coded ADO from “Amalgamated Drawing Office”. The Longbridge plant was up to date, having been thoroughly modernised in 1951, and compared very favourably with Nuffield’s 16 different and often old-fashioned factories scattered over the English Midlands. Austin’s management systems however, especially cost control and marketing, were not as good as Nuffield’s and as the market changed from a shortage of cars to competition this was to tell. The biggest-selling car, the Mini, was famously analysed by Ford Motor Company who concluded that BMC must be losing £30 on every one sold. The result was that although volumes held up well throughout the BMC era, market share fell as did profitability and hence investment in new models, triggering the 1966 merger with Jaguar Cars to form British Motor Holdings (BMH), and the government sponsored merger of BMH with Leyland Motor Corporation in 1968.

At the time of the mergers, there was a well-established dealership network for each of the marques. Among the car-buying British public there was a tendency of loyalty to a particular marque and marques appealed to different market segments. This meant that marques competed against each other in some areas, though some marques had a larger range than others. The Riley and Wolseley models were selling in very small numbers. Styling was also getting distinctly old fashioned and this caused Leonard Lord, in an unusual move for him, to call upon the services of an external stylist.

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