Springtime in New Zealand

joancarroll

Fort Worth, United States

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Artist's Description

It’s a weed, it is reviled. It is gorse. Gorse was imported to New Zealand by British colonists to establish hedgerows, and as food and shelter for livestock. While the frosts of Scotland keep gorse in check, the milder Kiwi climate allowed it to grow taller, ejected more seeds, and run rampant. It now covers a small but significant percentage of New Zealand’s entire land mass and is officially listed as one of their worst weeds. Each year a single gorse bush will produce 500–1,000 seeds (and occasionally up to 20,000) per square metre of ground. Seeds stay viable in the soil for over 100 years. As early as 1859, laws were passed to prevent its spread or sale. By 1893, gorse was common throughout the country, and as early as 1900 it was declared a noxious weed. But is sure is striking in the springtime when the countryside erupts in yellow color.

Artwork Comments

desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

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