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indiafrank

Parkside, Australia

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Artist's Description

FEATURED IN WILD OZ
FEATURED IN SPRING GLORIOUS SPRING

Swan Reach, South Australia.

1175 viewings as of 30 August 2018.

Canon EOS 500D with 18-270mm Tamron lens @ 200mm f6.3 1/320s 200 ISO.

Little Corellas are mostly white, with a fleshy blue eye-ring and a pale rose-pink patch between the eye and bill. In flight, a bright sulphur-yellow wash can be seen on the underwing and under tail. The sexes are similar in plumage, and young birds look like the adults, but are slightly smaller.

Little Corellas are widespread throughout Australia, although large gaps separate some populations. The Little Corella is the most widely distributed of the three corella species found in Australia. The Western Corella is confined the extreme south-west of Western Australia, and the Long-billed Corella is found in the south-east.

Little Corellas often form large flocks, especially along watercourses and where seeding grasses are found.

Little Corellas feed in large noisy flocks. The birds feed mainly on the ground, and have to drink on a daily basis. The most common foods are grains and grass seeds. Some bulbs and fruits may also be eaten.

Little Corellas are thought to pair for life and will start breeding at the start of a long period of rain. The nest site is a suitable tree hollow, lined with shavings of wood. This is normally used for several years in row. Both sexes incubate the eggs and both care for the young chicks. The chicks hatch naked and totally dependent on their parents.

Breeding pairs nest in large colonies, and several nests may be found in the same tree. Where their ranges overlap, different corella species may nest together, but they are not thought to breed with each other.

The Little Corella’s range is expanding with land clearing and increased sources of water. The increase in agricultural crops has so increased the birds’ numbers in some areas they may become pests. Escaped or deliberately released cage birds have also helped numbers in the east of Australia.

http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/species/Cacatua...

Artwork Comments

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