Child mother and infant, Kolkota

indiafrank

Parkside, Australia

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FEATURED IN YOUR COUNTRY’S BEST
FEATURED IN MOODY AND EVOCATIVE
FEATURED IN COVER SHOTS
FEATURED IN PEACE LOVE AND TRANQUILITY
FEATURED IN THE WORLD AS WE SEE IT OR AS WE MISSED IT
FEATURED IN JUST FOR YOU
FEATURED IN IF IT DOESN’T BELONG
FEATURED IN EXQUISITION

Dedicated to universal motherhood and child rights

In the Indian subcontinent, early marriage sometimes results in adolescent pregnancy, particularly in rural regions where the rate is much higher than it is in urbanized areas. Latest data suggests that teen pregnancy in India is high with 62 pregnant teens out of every 1,000 women. India is fast approaching to be the most populous country in the world, and increasing teenage pregnancy, an important factor for the population rise, is likely to aggravate the problem.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teenage_pregnancy

India and Bangladesh remain among the countries where a girl is extremely likely to be married before she is 18, and have a child while still a teenager a result, the United Nations said in a report released Wednesday.

Underage marriage and teen pregnancy are major health and economic concerns. Some 70,000 teen girls die every year from complications in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly in the developing world, the report said. The report did not say how many of these deaths take place in South Asia.

The lack of progress on reducing teen pregnancy in some countries in South Asia, where most adolescent pregnancies happen in wedlock, is closely tied to the deeply entrenched practice of child marriage. In India, nearly half of women marry under the age of 18, the report said, citing the most recent Indian government data available. In some states, that percentage is even higher even though the practice is outlawed throughout the country.

Gender rights groups working on the issue say that a complex mix of circumstances leads parents to continue to marry daughters off before they reach 18, including poverty and worries about having to pay a higher dowry [gift to the groom’s family] if they wait until a daughter is older or more educated. Demanding a dowry is illegal but still widely practiced.

“Everyone thinks that the earlier you get the girl married, the less money you’ll have to give,” said Ayesha Khatun, an activist whose organization, the Mohammad Bazar Backward Classes Development Society, runs a school for girls in West Bengal state in eastern India, and works with parents to convince them to delay their daughters’ marriages.

Parents also fear that unmarried daughters are more likely to face sexual violence, a problem India has been grappling with in the wake of the gang rape of a young woman in December (2012) that led to nationwide protests.

http://blogs.wsj.com/indiarealtime/2013/10/30/i...

SO WHY DO PARENTS CHOOSE CHILD MARRIAGE?

The parents of child brides are often poor and use marriage as a way to provide for their daughter’s future, especially in areas where there are few economic opportunities for women.

Some families use marriage to build and strengthen alliances, to seal property deals, settle disputes or pay off debts.

In some cultures, child marriage is encouraged to increase the number of pregnancies and ensure enough children survive into adulthood to work on family land and support elderly relatives.

In South Asia, some families marry off all their daughters at the same time to reduce the cost of the wedding ceremony.

Chastity is another major reason, and many parents want to make sure their daughters do not have a child outside marriage.

There are many other cultural reasons for child marriage. In India’s southern state of Tamil Nadu, some communities have a strong social stigma against girls being married after puberty. Some people in Ethiopia’s Amhara region believe that menstruation is induced by intercourse.

Some also fear that if girls receive an education, they will be less willing to fulfil their traditional roles as wife and mother.

The number of child marriages often increases during conflicts or natural disasters, when families seek protection for their daughters or money for themselves.

CAN IT BE STOPPED?

Many experts working in this field say that child marriage can be reduced by improving girls’ access to education and paid work; improving their confidence; increasing their knowledge of how their bodies work; raising awareness among communities of the consequences of child marriage; and improving laws and enforcing them.

http://www.trust.org/item/?map=qa-why-does-chil...

This photo was taken on my Minolta 9000 film SLR camera with 400 ASA film. I have digitalised all of my prints. I started scanning my 10,000 prints but realised I would be dead before that process finished, so I took digital photos of the prints with my Canon EOS 500D, tripod and remote.

Artwork Comments

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