Hanuman the monkey god

Acrylic Blocks

Size:
$25.00
indiafrank

Parkside, Australia

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Sizing Information

4 × 4
4" × 4" × 1"
6 × 6
6" × 6" × 1"

Features

  • Vibrant back mounted photographic prints
  • 1" (2.5 cm) thick solid free-standing acrylic block for desk, table top or shelves
  • Diamond cut sides provide a sharp image from any angle
  • Hand polished for a crystal clear finish
  • Available in 4×4" (10×10 cm) and 6×6" (15×15 cm)

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Artist's Description

FEATURED IN HAT HEADS

184 viewings as of 12 May 2017.

Hanuman is an ardent devotee of Sri Rama. He is one of the central figures in the Hindu epic Ramayana and its various versions. As one of the Chiranjivi, he is also mentioned in several other texts, including the Mahabharata, the various Puranas and some Jain texts. Hanuman participated in Rama’s war against the demon king Ravana. Several later texts also present him as an incarnation of Shiva. He is the son of Anjana and Kesari and is also son of the wind-god Pawan, who according to several stories, played a role in his birth.

The child received his name from the Sanskrit words Hanu (“jaw”) and -man (or -mant, “prominent” or “disfigured”). The name thus means “one with prominent or disfigured jaw”.

As a child, believing the sun to be a ripe mango, Hanuman pursued it in order to eat it. Rahu, a Vedic planet corresponding to an eclipse, was at that time seeking out the sun as well, and he clashed with Hanuman. Hanuman thrashed Rahu and went to take the sun in his mouth. Rahu approached Indra, king of devas, and complained that a monkey child stopped him from taking on Sun, preventing the scheduled eclipse. This enraged Indra, who responded by throwing the Vajra (thunderbolt) at Hanuman, which struck his jaw. He fell back down to the earth and became unconscious. A permanent mark was left on his chin (हनुः hanuḥ “jaw” in Sanskrit), due to impact of Vajra, explaining his name. Upset over the attack, Hanuman’s father figure Vayu deva (the deity of air) went into seclusion, withdrawing air along with him. As living beings began to asphyxiate, Indra withdrew the effect of his thunderbolt. The devas then revived Hanuman and blessed him with multiple boons to appease Vayu.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanuman

Artwork Comments

  • RobynLee
  • indiafrank
  • Allen Lucas
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

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