Sir Malcolm Campbell (colour)

Greeting Cards

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$2.95
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Joined October 2014

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Sizing Information

Small Greeting Card Large Greeting Card Postcard
4" x 6" 5" x 7.5" 4" x 6"

Features

  • Custom printed for pretty much every special thing there is
  • Digitally printed cards on heavyweight stock
  • Uncoated blank interior provides a superior writing surface
  • Each card comes with a kraft envelope for mailing or gifting

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Artist's Description

Sir Malcolm Campbell (11 March 1885 – 31 December 1948) was an English racing motorist and motoring journalist. He gained the world speed record on land and on water at various times during the 1920s and 1930s using vehicles called Blue Bird, including a 1921 Grand Prix Sunbeam. His son, Donald Campbell, carried on the family tradition by holding both land speed and water speed records.

He served in the First World War in the Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment and in the Royal Flying Corps.

During the late 1930s and the early years of the Second World War, he commanded the Provost Company of the 56th (London) Division of the Territorial Army. From 1940 to 1942 he commanded the Military Police contingent of the Coats Mission to evacuate King George VI, Queen Elizabeth and their immediate family in the event of German invasion.

He competed in Grand Prix motor racing, winning the 1927 and 1928 Grand Prix de Boulogne in France driving a Bugatti T37A.

He broke the land speed record for the first time in 1924 at 146.16 mph (235.22 km/h) at Pendine Sands near Carmarthen Bay in a 350HP V12 Sunbeam, now on display at the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu. Campbell broke nine land speed records between 1924 and 1935, with three at Pendine Sands and five at Daytona Beach. His first two records were driving a racing car built by Sunbeam.

On 4 February 1927 Campbell set the land speed record at Pendine Sands, covering the Flying Kilometre (in an average of two runs) at 174.883 mph (281.447 km/h) and the Flying Mile in 174.224 mph (280.386 km/h), in the Napier-Campbell Blue Bird. He set his final land speed record at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah on 3 September 1935, and was the first person to drive an automobile over 300 mph, averaging 301.337 mph (484.955 km/h) in two passes.

He developed and flotation tested Blue Bird on Tilgate Lake, in Tilgate Park, Crawley. He set the water speed record four times, his highest speed being 141.740 mph (228.108 km/h) in the Blue Bird K4. He set the record on 19 August 1939 on Coniston Water, Lancashire, England.

He died after a series of strokes in 1948 in Reigate, Surrey, aged 63 years. He was one of the few land speed record holders of his era to die of natural causes, as so many had died in crashes. His versatile racing on different vehicles made him internationally famous.

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