The Stranger / Albert Camus

iPhone Cases & Skins

Model:
$31.25
Heman Chong

Singapore, Singapore

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Specifications

  • Material

    Slim fitting one-piece clip-on case
    Protective Lip Weight Thickness
    Yes 15g Lightweight 3/64 inch Single Layer

Features

  • One-piece, clip-on protective case that’s slim and lightweight
  • Impact resistant polycarbonate shell allows full access to device ports
  • Super-bright colors embedded directly into the case
  • Minimal impact on overall device size, for extra protection, try Tough Cases
  • Features your chosen design by an independent artist
  • Compatible with Qi-standard wireless charging

Reviews

Cases & Skins

Artist's Description

This is a series of imaginary book cover designs drawn from classic novels.

The Stranger or The Outsider (French: L’Étranger) is a novel by Albert Camus published in 1942. Its theme and outlook are often cited as exemplars of existentialism.

The title character is Meursault, an Algerian (“a citizen of France domiciled in North Africa, a man of the Mediterranean, an homme du midi yet one who hardly partakes of the traditional Mediterranean culture”) who seemingly irrationally kills an Arab man whom he recognises in French Algiers. The story is divided into two parts: Meursault’s first-person narrative view before and after the murder, respectively.

The Librairie Gallimard first published the original French-language novel in 1942. British author Stuart Gilbert first translated L’Étranger to English in 1946; for more than thirty years his version was read as the standard English translation. In 1982, the British publisher Hamish Hamilton published a second translation, by Joseph Laredo, that Penguin Books bought in 1983 and reprinted in the Penguin Classics line in 2000. In 1988, a third translation, by the American Matthew Ward, was published, by Random House Inc., in the Vintage International line of Vintage Books. Because Camus was influenced by the American literary style, the 1988 translation was Americanised.

A critical difference of translation is in the connotation of the original French emotion in the story’s key sentence: “I laid my heart open to the benign indifference of the universe” in Gilbert’s versus Laredo’s “I laid my heart open to the gentle indifference of the universe” (original French: la tendre indifférence du monde = literally, “the tender indifference of the world”), although in the Penguin Classics 2000 reprint of Laredo’s translation, “gentle” was subsequently changed to “benign”.

The ending lines between the two aforementioned translations differ as well, from “on the day of my execution there should be a huge crowd of spectators and that they should greet me with howls of execration,” to " with cries of hatred", respectively, a significant scene that serves as a foil to the prior “indifference of the world”. In French, the triad is “cris de haine”, which Ward’s transliteral interpretation is closest to in terms of phonics. Gilbert’s interpretation takes the liberty of juxtaposing “execration” with “execution”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Stranger_%28no...

desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

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