SAVE OUR REEF

T-Shirts & Hoodies

Clothing Style:
$22.75
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  • Artwork Comments 16

Sizing Information

S M L XL 2XL 3XL
Chest 36" 40" 44" 48" 52" 56"
Length 28" 29" 30" 31" 32" 33"
Sizing chart
Model wears a size L

Features

  • Plain colour t-shirts are 100% Cotton, Heather Grey is 90% Cotton/10% Polyester, Charcoal Heather is 52% Cotton/48% Polyester
  • Ethically sourced
  • Slim fit, but if that's not your thing, order a size up
  • 4.2oz/145g, but if that's too light, try our heavier classic tee.

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Artist's Description

100% of sales will be donated to :

“Greenpeace Australia”(:http://www.greenpeace.org/australia/)

The Great Barrier Reef is a site of remarkable variety and beauty on the north-east coast of Australia. It contains the world’s largest collection of coral reefs, with 400 types of coral, 1,500 species of fish and 4,000 types of mollusc. It also holds great scientific interest as the habitat of species such as the dugong (‘sea cow’) and the large green turtle, which are threatened with extinction.
Australia’s Great Barrier Reef will lose 95 per cent of its living coral by 2050 – predicts a new report. And this devastating situation will occur if the best-case scenario for global warming unfolds.

The GBR is the largest and one of the healthiest reef systems in the world. But certain stresses, including temporarily warmer water temperatures, can cause widespread coral bleaching. This occurs when coral expel their symbiotic algae.

The new report, commissioned by WWF and the Queensland government, considers “thermal stresses” on the reef – sustained temperatures that exceed corals’ tolerance, causing mass bleachings, and coral death. “By about 2050, the thermal threshold of all corals in the reef will be exceeded,” says Hoegh-Guldberg.

Ove Hoegh-Guldberg accepts that on a geological scale, the GBR will recover. Under the best-case global warming scenario, temperatures will stabilise at the end of this century, and the Reef will recover over the following century. Under the worst, it will take at least 500 years for it to regenerate, populated by corals adapted to living in warmer waters……….

Source – newscientist.com

Artwork Comments

  • Nancy Stafford
  • Varinia   - Globalphotos
  • Love Through The Lens
  • Varinia   - Globalphotos
  • Steven  Agius
  • Varinia   - Globalphotos
  • MattTworkowski
  • Varinia   - Globalphotos
  • Matt Halls
  • Varinia   - Globalphotos
  • Marcus Grant IPA
  • Marcus Grant IPA
  • Varinia   - Globalphotos
  • Sean Farragher
  • CMCphotoart
  • Varinia   - Globalphotos
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