Black Magic

Ginny York

Amherst, United States

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Artist's Description

I found this black mushroom growing on the side of my driveway. There were three of them. This one was a pretty good size, but not the biggest one. This was about 3 1/2 inches across the top. I have no idea what type of mushroom it is. If anyone knows, please let me know. I have never seen one like this in my life before….and that’s a pretty long time. :)) It was a magic moment for me finding this and so that’s how it got it’s title.
Taken in my yard in Amherst, Virginia, USA with my Canon Powershot SX110 iS on a macro setting. As is…nothing at all done to it. :))

Special thanks to Carla Wick/Jandelle Petters for letting me know what type of mushroom this is!!

FEATURED IN PEACE, LOVE & TRANQUILITY
FEATURED IN THE WORLD AS WE SEE IT
FEATURED IN FUNGILIOUS
FEATURED IN FOOD FOR THOUGHT

STROBILOMYCES STROBILACEUS
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
EDIBLE

Strobilomyces strobilaceus, also called Strobilomyces floccopus and commonly known as Old Man of the Woods, is a species of fungus in the Boletaceae family. It is native to Europe and North America. Fruit bodies are characterized by very soft dark grey to black pyramidal and overlapping scales on the cap surface.

Taxonomy and naming
Strobilomyces strobilaceus is classified in the section Strobilomyces of the genus Strobilomyces. Species in this section are characterized by having spores that may be either smooth or with short spines or warts, ridges or reticulations. It was first described scientifically by the Italian naturalist Giovanni Antonio Scopoli in 1770.

Description
The caps of the fruit bodies are between 1.6 to 3.9 inches wide, with a convex shape and a villous, involute margin. The cap surface is covered with dark grey to black erect scales. The stem is up to 5.5 inches long and 0.8 inches thick. It is colored like the cap and has a wolly surface and a thick, ascending annulus. The pores on the underside of the cap are hexagonal, colored dirty white or grey. The flesh is thick and initially white, but will stain pink and then slate grey and black after exposure to the air.

Habitat and distribution
S. strobilaceus is found solitary or in groups in deciduous as well as coniferous forests in low mountain ranges and alpine areas of Europe and North America. It is less common in lowlands. The fungus appears between August and October and young specimens are edible.

Artwork Comments

  • Larry Trupp
  • Ginny York
  • Maria  Moro
  • Ginny York
  • Elaine Teague
  • Ginny York
  • Carla Wick/Jandelle Petters
  • Ginny York
  • Rusty Katchmer
  • Ginny York
  • SelinaEM
  • Ginny York
  • Deborah Lazarus
  • Ginny York
  • Ginny York
  • Julie  White
  • Ginny York
  • CanyonWind
  • Ginny York
  • Ginny York
  • peaky40
  • Ginny York
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