Burrowing Owl - "Mr. Big Eyes"

Dennis Stewart

Keller, United States

  • Available
    Products
    12
  • Artist
    Notes
  • Artwork Comments 7

Cases & Skins

Wall Art

Home Decor

Bags

Stationery

Artist's Description

You don’t think of Owls living in the ground, but that is exactly where this special Owl species resides….

GENERAL INFORMATION:
The Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) is a small, long-legged owl found throughout open landscapes of North and South America. Burrowing owls can be found in grasslands, rangelands, agricultural areas, deserts, or any other dry, open area with low vegetation. They nest and roost in burrows, such as those excavated by prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.). Unlike most owls, burrowing owls are often active during the day, although they tend to avoid the mid-day heat. Most hunting is still done from dusk until dawn, when their owl apomorphies are most advantageous.

Burrowing owls have bright yellow eyes. The beak can be between yellowish or greenish depending on the subspecies. The babies legs are incompletely feathered and grayish in color. They lack ear tufts and have a flattened facial disc. The owls have prominent white eyebrows and a white “chin” patch which they expand and display during certain behaviors, such as bobbing of the head when agitated.

Adult owls have brown upperparts with white spotting. The breast and belly are white with variable brown spotting or barring. Juvenile owls are similar in appearance, but they lack most of the white spotting above and brown barring below. Also, the young owls have a buff bar across the upper wing and their breast may be buffy rather than white.

Males and females are similar in size and appearance. The female bird is darker in color, however, adult males appear lighter in color because they spend more time outside the burrow during daylight, and their feathers become “sun-bleached”. The average adult is slightly larger than an American robin (Turdus migratorius), at 25 cm (10 inches) length, 53 cm (21 inches) wingspan, and 170g (6 oz).1

Vocalizations

The typical who who call of a burrowing owl is associated with territory defense and breeding, and is often given by adult males to attract a female to a promising burrow. They also make other sounds, which are described as chucks, chattering, and screams. These sounds are usually accompanied by an up and down bobbing of the head. When alarmed, young birds will give a hissing call that sounds like a rattlesnake.

All Products Tags

bird

Artwork Comments

  • Bunny Clarke
  • Robert Elliott
  • robmac
  • Jon Staniland
  • Marvin Collins
  • Beverley  Johnston
  • Antanas
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

10% off

for joining the Redbubble mailing list

Receive exclusive deals and awesome artist news and content right to your inbox. Free for your convenience.