Apolinaro Mabini - Pilipino Rebel

Duvet Covers

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$86.00
cynicmunchkin

Joined February 2018

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Sizing Information

Twin 68" x 88"
Queen 88" x 88"
King 104" x 88"

Features

  • Brushed polyester printed topside
  • Soft cotton/polyester white underside
  • Concealed zipper opening and internal insert ties for easy assembly
  • Machine wash cold on gentle cycle. For best results, use a mild detergent.
  • Getting ready for dorm living? US Twin duvet cover fits US Twin XL
  • Duvet insert not included

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Artist's Description

A photo of Mabini, imprisoned by the Americans in Anda Street Prison Intramuros, digitally colorized by the Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office.

The Philippine–American War saw Mabini taken more seriously as a threat by the Americans than he was under the Spanish:15 Says National Artist for Literature F. Sionil Jose:

“The Spaniards underestimated Mabini primarily because he was a cripple. Had they known of his intellectual perspicacity, they would have killed him earlier. The Americans did not. They were aware of his superior intelligence, his tenacity when he faced them in negotiations for autonomy and ceasefire.”15
On December 10, 1899, he was captured by Americans at Cuyapo, Nueva Ecija, but granted leave to meet with W.H. Taft.14:546–547 In 1901, he was exiled to Guam, along with scores of revolutionists Americans referred to as ‘insurrectos’ and who refused to swear fealty to imperialist America. When Brig. Gen. Arthur C. MacArthur, Jr. was asked to explain by the US Senate why Mabini had to be deported, he cabled:

“ Mabini deported: a most active agitator; persistently and defiantly refusing amnesty, and maintaining correspondence with insurgents in the field while living in Manila, Luzon…16
Mabini returned home to the Philippines in Feb. 1903 after agreeing to take the oath of allegiance to the United States14:547 on February 26, 1903 before the Collector of Customs. On the day he sailed, he issued this statement to the press:

“ After two long years I am returning, so to speak, completely disoriented and, what is worse, almost overcome by disease and sufferings. Nevertheless, I hope, after some time of rest and study, still to be of some use, unless I have returned to the Islands for the sole purpose of dying.17
To the chagrin of the American colonial officials, however, Mabini resumed his work of agitating for independence for the Philippines soon after he was back home from exile.18[not in citation given]

Death
Not long after his return, Mabini died of cholera in Manila on May 13, 1903 at the age of 38.14:547

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