Everything – 20% = a good reason to get sweet stuff. Use GOGET20

Celtic Tree of Life, Yggdrasil [Gold]

T-Shirts & Hoodies

Clothing Style:
$32.66
Serge Averbukh

Toronto, Canada

  • Product
    Info
  • Product
    Reviews
  • Available
    Products
    53
  • Artist
    Notes

Sizing Information

S M L XL 2XL 3XL
Chest 36" 40" 44" 48" 52" 56"
Length 28" 29" 30" 31" 32" 33"
Sizing chart
Model wears a size L

Features

  • Plain colour t-shirts are 100% Cotton, Heather Grey is 90% Cotton/10% Polyester, Charcoal Heather is 52% Cotton/48% Polyester
  • Ethically sourced
  • Slim fit, but if that's not your thing, order a size up
  • 4.2oz/145g, but if that's too light, try our heavier classic tee.

Reviews

Apparel

Cases & Skins

Wall Art

Home Decor

Bags

Stationery

Artist's Description

Introducing ‘Sacred Symbols’ collection by Serge Averbukh, showcasing stunning convergent media paintings of various sacred artifacts and symbology. Here you will find pieces featuring Celtic Tree of Life – an ancient symbol illustrating the idea that all life on earth is related. The tree of knowledge, connecting heaven and the underworld, and the tree of life, connecting all forms of creation, are both forms of the world tree or cosmic tree.
In Egypt the Acacia tree of Saosis was considered the “tree of life”, referring to it as the “tree in which life and death are enclosed”. References to The Tree of Life can be found in ancient Assyria, China, as well as in Germanic paganism and Norse mythology, Judaism, Kabbalah, Christianity, Vedic texts of India, sources from Urartu and Mesoamerica.
In Norse mythology it is also known as Yggdrasil, an immense tree that is central in Norse cosmology. It was said to be the world tree around which the nine worlds existed. Its name is generally considered to mean “Ygg’s (Odin’s) horse”. Yggdrasil is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both sources, Yggdrasil is an immense ash tree that is central and considered very holy. The gods go to Yggdrasil daily to hold their courts. The branches of Yggdrasil extend far into the heavens, and the tree is supported by three roots that extend far away into other locations; one to the well Urðarbrunnr in the heavens, one to the spring Hvergelmir, and another to the well Mímisbrunnr. Creatures live within Yggdrasil, including the wyrm (dragon) Níðhöggr, an unnamed eagle, and the stags Dáinn, Dvalinn, Duneyrr and Duraþrór.
It is also a representation of a so-called warden tree. A very old tree (often a linden, ash or elm) growing on the farm lot could be dubbed a “warden tree”, and was believed to defend it from bad luck. Breaking a leaf or twig from the warden tree was considered a serious offence. The respect for the tree was so great that the family housing it could adopt a surname related to it. It was often believed that the wights of the yard lived under the roots of the warden tree, and to them, one sacrificed treats to be freed from disease or bad luck. Continuing as late as the 19th century, warden trees were venerated in areas of Germany and Scandinavia, considered being guardians and bringers of luck, and offerings were sometimes made to them. Position of the tree in the center considered to be a source of luck and protection for gods and men.

desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

10% off

for joining the Redbubble mailing list

Receive exclusive deals and awesome artist news and content right to your inbox. Free for your convenience.