Climbing the cliffs at Gallipoli, 1915

Canvas Prints

Size:
$52.00
artfromthepast

Joined May 2015

  • Product
    Info
  • Product
    Reviews
  • Available
    Products
    19
  • Artist
    Notes
  • Artwork Comments 1

Sizing Information

Small 8.0" x 11.8"
Medium 12.0" x 17.7"
Large 16.0" x 23.6"
X large 20.0" x 29.5"

Features

  • Each custom artwork is hand stretched and printed for your order
  • Vibrant colors printed on artist grade canvas
  • Printed image wraps 0.25 inch (0.6 cm) over the edges; the sides are white
  • Hanging hardware is included

- Reviews

Apparel

Cases & Skins

Wall Art

Home Decor

Bags

Stationery

Artist's Description

Please note with regard to scanned antique prints there may be some age related marks or faults from the originals which will show also on any print ordered. This is inevitable with prints of this age & actually lends an authentic look to the prints. Please refer to the actual image on sale. If you are interested in purchasing the original engraving or print that may be possible if I still have it, please send me a private message to check.

Please also note that the wording artfromthepast on the image shown is just a watermark & will not appear on your final print or other product.

Illustration by George Soper (1870-1942) from the Illustrated War Record published in 1918. Info from wiki: The Gallipoli Campaign, also known as the Dardanelles Campaign, the Battle of Gallipoli, or the Battle of Çanakkale (Turkish: Çanakkale Savaşı), was a campaign of the First World War that took place on the Gallipoli peninsula (Gelibolu in modern Turkey) in the Ottoman Empire between 25 April 1915 and 9 January 1916. The peninsula forms the northern bank of the Dardanelles, a strait that provided a sea route to the Russian Empire, one of the Allied powers during the war. Intending to secure it, Russia’s allies Britain and France launched a naval attack followed by an amphibious landing on the peninsula, with the aim of capturing the Ottoman capital of Constantinople (modern Istanbul).8 The naval attack was repelled and after eight months’ fighting, with many casualties on both sides, the land campaign was abandoned and the invasion force was withdrawn to Egypt.
The campaign was the only major Ottoman victory of the war. In Turkey, it is regarded as a defining moment in the nation’s history, a final surge in the defence of the motherland as the Ottoman Empire crumbled. The struggle formed the basis for the Turkish War of Independence and the declaration of the Republic of Turkey eight years later, with Mustafa Kemal (Kemal Atatürk) as President, who rose to prominence as a commander at Gallipoli. The campaign is often considered to be the beginning of Australian and New Zealand national consciousness; 25 April, the anniversary of the landings, is known as “Anzac Day”, the most significant commemoration of military casualties and veterans in the two countries, surpassing Remembrance Day (Armistice Day)

Artwork Comments

  • kalaryder
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

10% off

for joining the Redbubble mailing list

Receive exclusive deals and awesome artist news and content right to your inbox. Free for your convenience.