A Tree Stands at Devil's Den

Canvas Prints

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$48.00
AngieDavies

Joined March 2010

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Sizing Information

Small 10.7" x 8.0"
Medium 16.0" x 12.0"
Large 21.3" x 16.0"
X large 26.7" x 20.0"

Features

  • Each custom artwork is hand stretched and printed for your order
  • Vibrant colors printed on artist grade canvas
  • Printed image wraps 0.25 inch (0.6 cm) over the edges; the sides are white
  • Hanging hardware is included

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Artist's Description

VIEWS 101 2/27/11

FEATURED IN IMAGE WRITING GROUP 2/09/11

Devil’s Den is a nickname for a terrain feature south of Gettysburg, Pa. USA, that was the site of fierce fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg during the American Civil War. The central feature of Devil’s Den is an outcropping of massive boulders. The origin of the name of “Devil’s Den” is uncertain. All documented references to it are post-battle, although historian John D. Bachelder claimed in his 1873 travel book, Gettysburg:What to See and How to See It, that “it was a name given to the locality before the battle.” Stories by local resident Emanuel Bushman, first documented in 1844, claim that a “monster snake” resided there. An account by Salome Myers Stewart in 1913 referred to a snake named “The Devil”, which was never caught and thus became legendary. Some accounts by soldiers after the battle began using the name "Devil’s Cave, or “Devil’s Den” because of the appearance of the area. The boulders, tumbled together loosely, form numerous natural caves, the “den” of the name. On the upper horizontal surface of one of the uppermost boulders is a depression used as a cistern. When viewed from higher ground, the depression resembles a gigantic horned bat in flight-the “devil” of the name. The natural caves and galleries among the boulders provided cover for sharpshooters from both sides throughout the battle. By the late 19th century, the name “Devil’s Den” became universal. REF: WIKIPEDIA

This tree is quite large and stands above Devil’s Den with the massive boulders of the site just below it. To me it seems symbolic of the survival of man through the trials and tribulations of life, one of which is war. Photographed with Canon PowerShot S51S Jan. 2011

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Artwork Comments

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