Boy Oh Boy Teething Is A Pain!! - Lion Cub - Orana Wildlife Park - CHC NZ

AndreaEL

Gore, New Zealand

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Most lionesses will have reproduced by the time they are four years of age. The female giving birth to a litter of one to four cubs in a secluded den (which may be a thicket, a reed-bed, a cave or some other sheltered area) usually away from the rest of the pride. She will often hunt by herself while the cubs are still helpless, staying relatively close to the thicket or den where the cubs are kept. The cubs themselves are born blind—their eyes do not open until roughly a week after birth. They weigh 1.2–2.1 kg (2.6–4.6 lb) at birth and are almost helpless, beginning to crawl a day or two after birth and walking around three weeks of age. The lioness moves her cubs to a new den site several times a month, carrying them one by one by the nape of the neck, to prevent scent from building up at a single den site and thus avoiding the attention of predators that may harm the cubs. Usually, the mother does not integrate herself and her cubs back into the pride until the cubs are six to eight weeks old. If one lioness gives birth to a litter of cubs a couple of months after another lioness, for instance, then the younger cubs, being much smaller than their older brethren, are usually dominated by larger cubs at mealtimes—consequently, death by starvation is more common amongst the younger cubs. In addition to starvation, cubs also face many other dangers, such as predation by jackals, hyenas, leopards, martial eagles and snakes. Even buffaloes, should they catch the scent of lion cubs, often stampede towards the thicket or den where they are being kept, doing their best to trample the cubs to death while warding off the lioness.
Lions are part of a group of exotic animals that are the core of zoo exhibits since the late eighteenth century; members of this group are invariably large vertebrates and include elephants, rhinoceroses, hippopotamuses, large primates, and other big cats; zoos sought to gather as many of these species as possible.
Taken at Orana Wildlife Park Christchruch New Zealand through the fencing. Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ35 April 2011 soft focus applied in Picasa

*Boy Oh Boy Teething Is A Pain!!

Totally Focused, Totally In The Moment!

I’m Not Smiling Today!

Marking My Spot! – Cheetah

Am I A Mere Cat? I Don’t Think So! – Meerkat

Phew! Is This Day Over Yet?

Orana Wildlife Park is operated by Orana Wildlife Trust. Set on 80 hectares of park-like grounds, Orana Wildlife Park is New Zealand ’s only open range zoo. The Park has been developed as an open range sanctuary for endangered animals, providing them with enclosures as close to their natural habitat as possible. Streams, moats and banks are used as barriers to allow visitors the opportunity to see the animals in a natural manner. Over 400 animals from 70 different species are displayed.

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  • AndreaEL
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