4 You . by Brown Sugar . rTribute to Oskar Barnack , Enst Leitz ! Love You Leica !!! Featured * Views (99) thanks !

Framed Prints

Size:
Frame Style:
Frame Color:
Mat Color:
$116.67
  • Product
    Info
  • Product
    Reviews
  • Available
    Products
    9
  • Artist
    Notes
  • Artwork Comments 7

Sizing Information

Small 12.0" x 7.0"
Medium 18.0" x 10.4"
Large 24.0" x 13.9"
Note: Image size. Matboard and frame increase size of final product

Features

  • Custom-made box or flat frame styles
  • High-quality timber frame finishes to suit your decor
  • Premium Perspex - clearer and lighter than glass
  • Exhibition quality box or flat frame styles

- Reviews

Wall Art

Home Decor

Bags

Stationery

Artist's Description

Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX 5 .

Portrait .

.http://pl.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Plik:...

F E A T U R E D …..in group:
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

My wonderful memories/Moje wspaniałe wspomnienia . 12 – 06 – 2011 .

Reproduction of the Leica Prototype, 1913, 1:3,5
The first Leica prototypes were built by Oskar Barnack at Ernst Leitz Optische Werke, Wetzlar, in 1913. Intended as a compact camera for landscape photography, particularly during mountain trips, the Leica was the first practical 35 mm camera, using standard cinema 35 mm film. The Leica transports the film horizontally, extending the frame size to 24×36 mm, instead of the 18×24 mm used by cinema cameras which transported the film vertically, with a 2:3 aspect ratio.
The Leica went through several iterations, and in 1923 Barnack convinced his boss, Ernst Leitz II, to make a prototype series of 31. The camera was an immediate success when introduced at the 1925 Leipzig Spring Fair as the Leica I (for Leitz camera). The focal plane shutter had a range from 1/20 to 1/500 second, in addition to a Z for Zeit (time) position.
Because Barnack’s concept for the Leica was to use a small camera, producing a small negative, to make a big picture by enlargement, (“small negative, large picture” concept) the camera needed high quality lenses to create sharp negatives. The first Leica lens was a 50 mm f/3.5 design based on the Cooke triplet of 1894 adapted by Professor Max Berek at Leitz. The lens had five elements in three groups and was called the Leitz Anastigmat. This lens was later renamed the ELMAX, for E Leitz and MAX Berek. By 1925 the Leitz laboratories had produced glasses with improved optical properties and Professor Berek designed an improved version of the ELMAX influenced by the Zeiss Tessar called the ELMAR with four elements in three groups. Professor Berek had two dogs, Hektor and Rex. The first of these, Hektor, gave his name to a series of Leica lenses.2
In 1930 came the Leica I Schraubgewinde with an exchangeable lens system based on a 39mm diameter screw thread, often referred to as " Leica Thread Mount" or LTM. In addition to the 50mm normal lens, a 35mm wide angle and a 135 mm telephoto lens were initially available. In the mid-1930s, a legendary soft-focus lens, the Thambar 90mm f2.2 was designed, and made in small numbers between 1935 and 1949, no more than 3000 units. It is a rare collector’s item today.34
The Leica II came in 1932, with a built in rangefinder coupled to the lens focusing mechanism. This model had a separate viewfinder (showing a reduced image) and rangefinder. In 1932 the flange to filmplane was standarised to 28.8mm, first implemented on Leica model C, and the Leica Standard the following year.5
The Leica III added slow shutter speeds down to 1 second, and the model IIIa added the 1/1000 second shutter speed. The IIIa was the last model made before Barnack’s death, and therefore the last model for which he was wholly responsible. Leitz continued to refine the original design through to 1957. The final version, the IIIg, included a large viewfinder with several framelines. These models all had a functional combination of circular dials and square windows.
Early Leica cameras bear the initials D.R.P., which stands for Deutsches Reichspatent, the name for German patents before May 1945. This is probably a reference to German patent No. 384071 “Rollfilmkamera” granted to Ernst Leitz, Optische Werke in Wetzlar, on 3 November 1923.
[edit]After WWII
After the war, Leitz continued to produce the late versions of the Leica II and the Leica III through the 1950s. However, in 1954, Leitz unveiled the Leica M3 introducing the new Leica M mount, a bayonet type lens mount. The new camera also combined the rangefinder and viewfinder into one large, bright viewfinder with a brighter double image in the center. This system also introduced a system of parallax compensation. In addition, it had a new rubberized, reliable, focal-plane shutter. This model has continued to be refined (the latest versions being the M7 and MP, both of which have frames for 28, 35, 50, 75, 90, and 135 mm lenses which show automatically upon mounting the different lenses).
Post-war models bear the initials DBP, standing for Deutsches Bundespatent (Federal German Patent), instead of the DRP found on pre-war models.
A number of camera companies built models based on the Leica rangefinder design. These include the Leotax, Nicca and early Canon models in Japan, the Kardon in USA, the Reid in England and the FED and Zorki in the USSR.

Wall Art Tags

tribute to leica

All Products Tags

tribute to leica

Artwork Comments

  • Norma-jean Morrison
  • © Andrzej Goszcz,M.D. Ph.D
  • Bobby Dar
  • © Andrzej Goszcz,M.D. Ph.D
  • TeresaB
  • © Andrzej Goszcz,M.D. Ph.D
  • Gavin Kerslake
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

10% off

for joining the Redbubble mailing list

Receive exclusive deals and awesome artist news and content right to your inbox. Free for your convenience.