The Vanderbilt Mansion Breakers from the Cliff Walk, Newport RI

Throw Pillows

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$20.81
Jane Neill-Hancock

Wayne, United States

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Sizing Information

Size Perfect for Insert available
Throw Pillow 16 x 16 inch Couch, Bed
Throw Pillow 18 x 18 inch Couch, Bed
Throw Pillow 20 x 20 inch Couch, Bed
Throw Pillow 24 x 24 inch Couch, Bed, Floor
Throw Pillow 26 x 26 inch Couch, Bed, Floor
Floor Pillow 36 x 36 inch Floor Cover only
Note: Some designs are not available in all sizes.

We recommend using inserts/fills that are bigger than the covers to ensure a plump finish

Features

  • Vibrant double-sided print throw pillows to update any room
  • Independent designs, custom printed when you order
  • Soft and durable 100% Spun Polyester cover with an optional Polyester fill/insert
  • Concealed zip opening for a clean look and easy care

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Artist's Description

The Breakers is a Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island, United States on the Atlantic Ocean. It is a National Historic Landmark, a contributing property to the Bellevue Avenue Historic District, and is owned and operated by the Preservation Society of Newport County.

The Breakers was built as the Newport summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II, a member of the wealthy United States Vanderbilt family. The 70-room mansion has approximately 65,000 sq ft of living space. The home was constructed between 1893 and 1895 at a cost of more than $12 million (approximately $335 million in today’s dollars adjusted for inflation).

The property borders on the seagirt cliffs of Newport, it faces east overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.

Vanderbilt died from a cerebral hemorrhage caused from a second stroke during 1899 at the age of 55, leaving the Breakers to his wife, Alice Gwynne Vanderbilt. She outlived her husband by 35 years and died at the age of 89 during 1934. In her will, The Breakers was given to her youngest daughter, Countess Gladys Széchenyi (1886–1965), essentially because Gladys lacked American property. Also, none of Alice’s other children were interested in the property while Gladys had always loved the estate.

During 1948, Gladys leased the high-maintenance property to the non-profit Preservation Society of Newport County for $1 a year. The Society bought the Breakers during 1972 for $365,000 from Countess Sylvia Szapary, the daughter of Gladys. However, the agreement with the Society allows the family to continue to live on the third floor, which is not open to the public. Countess Sylvia lived there part time until her death on March 1, 1998. Gladys and Paul Szapary, Sylvia’s children, spend summers there to this day, hidden from the hundreds of thousands of tourists who explore below.

Although the mansion is owned by the Society, the original furnishings displayed throughout the house are still owned by the family.

It is now the most-visited attraction in Rhode Island with approximately 300,000 visitors annually and is open year-round for tours.

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