IN THE HANDS OF THE HUN [14] Hamburg

At Hamburg

After a few months work as farm hand I was given a complete change of occupation. I was sent to the city of Hamburg and had to work as a gas stoker in the large municipal gas works of that city. It was hard, hot work but there were a good many women and girls engaged in the same work though not allowed to work with the prisoners. We worked eight hour shifts and after each shift got a bath which we sorely needed. For this work we received 12/- ($1.20) per week. We slept in a room on the premises and were allowed a fair amount of freedom when off duty. I was allowed to go into the city and spend what money I had. I was in Hamburg when the revolution broke out prior to the signing of the Armistice and I attended several meetings held by the Soviets.
One meeting was arranged for prisoners of war and we were told that our treatment was not due to the people of Germany but to the militarists. We were told that no harm would be done to us by the Soviet and that if we received further ill-treatment we were to complain to them and they would call out the marines to protect us.
However, it was only a few weeks after this when I saw in the German paper the proclamation setting forth the terms of the Armistice. The paragraph that interested me most was that which stated, “Immediate relief of allied prisoners”. Well, I went back and worked another couple of shifts at the gas works and then told the manager that I was not going to work any longer. He offered me civilian pay if I would stay on but I said no. He gave me the pay due and off I went. I could not get back to the head camp for 4 days so I had to do my last starve in Germany for that period but when I got back I found plenty of parcels waiting for me.

IN THE HANDS OF THE HUN [14] Hamburg

adgray

Frankston, Australia

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Artist's Description

Great Uncle Alf must have shown himself to be a trusted person to be given this new job which came with a good measure of freedom! but still there was just one last “Starve” before it was all over!

*This is why we remember them !
LEST WE FORGET !!

NB This is NOT my Fictional Writing this is an actual account written by my Great Uncle Alfred Gray following his experiences in the "Great War – 1914-1917
I take no responsibility for any offense taken by the reader of this view be that in the language used or the opinion of my Great Uncle.*

Great Uncle Alfred’s Great Adventure
In the Hands of the Hun 1 – Prelude
In the Hands of the Hun 2 – Bullecourt
In the Hands of the Hun 3 -Starved and Frozen
In the Hands of the Hun [4 & 5] – Lille
In the Hands of the Hun [6, 7 & 8] – behind the lines
In the Hands of the Hun 9 – Surprise
In the Hands of the Hun 10 -Congenial Mates
In the Hands of the Hun 11 – Camp Life
In the Hands of the Hun 12 – Farm Work
In the Hands of the Hun 13 – Punishment

In the Hands of the Hun 15 – Red Cross

Artwork Comments

  • Dawn B Davies-McIninch
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