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Question about fonts copyright

FARO FARO 16 posts

When I create a T-shirt image showing one word or two, do I need the permission of the designer who made the font I am using? Do I need any kind of licence for doing so?
Thank you

ROUBLE RUST ROUBLE RUST 1782 posts

Generally yes, you should ask the permission / license of the font designer – unless it’s clearly stated free for use (not only for personal use), but for use including commercial gain, profit, business, merchandise and prints.

Magi5760 Magi5760 712 posts

There are thousands of fonts that are either installed on your computer or can be downloaded free without restrictions. I’m assuming you are speaking about a specifically designed font? You would probably have to get permission, or you can even design your own font – which would be way cool!

Cindy Schnackel Cindy Schnackel 5057 posts

That might be a good question to ask on the Copyright Protection group too.

Cindy Schnackel Cindy Schnackel 5057 posts

Felix, changing a logo (or any artwork, etc), doesn’t, by itself, make it legal to use. That’s a myth that has been around a long time, unfortunately. I think the use you gave as an example might fall under an exception, parody, but I’m not sure. (Parody is more than just saying “this is parody.”) The link I gave above is for a Red Bubble group on copyright issues. There is a lot of info there on these topics. You can join the group and start a new topic, too.

A lot of the myths about changing work probably start from confusion over “derivative work” and “transformative work.” Only the copyright owner has a right to make derivative work from their property. And like parody, criticism, and other legal exceptions, there are gray areas as to what is ‘transformative,’ too.

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