Happy Independence Day!!!

Marjorie Wallace

Lacey, United States

Artist's Description

Lake Washington, Washington state
201 Views 05 July 2011


Featured in AMERICAN PATRIOT ~ 2 April 2010

Pride in our country has always been something we are all raised with. We see little chldren waving flags or saluting flags as their parents help them understand how important our flag is. The stars on our flag represent each state that has been accepted into our statehood, so it has changed over the years.

“The national flag of the United States of America (the American flag) consists of thirteen equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white, with a blue rectangle in the canton bearing fifty small, white, five-pointed stars arranged in nine offset horizontal rows of six stars (top and bottom) alternating with rows of five stars. The fifty stars on the flag represent the 50 states and the 13 stripes represent the original thirteen colonies that rebelled against the British monarchy and became the first states in the Union.1 Nicknames for the flag include the Stars and Stripes, Old Glory,2 and The Star-Spangled Banner (also the name of the national anthem).
The flag of the United States is one of the nation’s most widely recognized symbols. Within the U.S. it is frequently displayed, not only on public buildings, but on private residences. It is also used as a motif on decals for car windows, and clothing ornaments such as badges and lapel pins. Throughout the world it is used in public discourse to refer to the U.S., not only as a nation, state, government, and set of policies, but also as an ideology and set of ideals.

Apart from the numbers of stars and stripes representing the number of current and original states, respectively, and the union with its stars representing a constellation, there is no legally defined symbolism to the colors and shapes on the flag. However, folk theories and traditions abound.
When Alaska and Hawaii were being considered for statehood in the 1950s, more than 1,500 designs were spontaneously submitted to President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Although some of them were 49-star versions, the vast majority were 50-star proposals. At least three, and probably more[citation needed], of these designs were identical to the present design of the 50-star flag.10 At the time, credit was given by the executive department to the United States Army Institute of Heraldry for the design.

Of these proposals, one created by 17-year old Robert G. Heft in 1958 as a school project has received the most publicity. His mother was a seamstress, but refused to do any of the work for him. He originally received a B- for the project. After discussing the grade with his teacher, it was agreed (somewhat jokingly) that if the flag was accepted by Congress, the grade would be reconsidered. Heft’s flag design was chosen and adopted by presidential proclamation after Alaska and before Hawaii was admitted into the union in 1959. He got an A.

“Flags at Sea
Flags are particularly important at sea, where they can mean the difference between life and death, and consequently where the rules and regulations for the flying of flags are strictly enforced. A national flag flown at sea is known as an ensign. A courteous, peaceable merchant ship or yacht customarily flies its ensign (in the usual ensign position), together with the flag of whatever nation it is currently visiting at the mast (known as a courtesy flag). To fly one’s ensign alone in foreign waters, a foreign port or in the face of a foreign warship traditionally indicates a willingness to fight, with cannon, for the right to do so. As of 2009, this custom is still taken seriously by many naval and port authorities and is readily enforced in many parts of the world by boarding, confiscation and other civil penalties.”
(Excerpts from Wikipedia)

Artwork Comments

  • robpixaday
  • Marjorie Wallace
  • Barbara Applegate
  • Marjorie Wallace
  • CeePhotoArt
  • Marjorie Wallace
  • Bootiewootsy
  • Marjorie Wallace
  • AnnDixon
  • Marjorie Wallace
  • Sean Farragher
  • Marjorie Wallace
  • Marjorie Wallace
  • Kathy Bucari
  • Marjorie Wallace
  • Laddie Halupa
  • Marjorie Wallace
  • Charmiene Maxwell-Batten
  • Marjorie Wallace
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

10%off for joining

the Redbubble mailing list

Receive exclusive deals and awesome artist news and content right to your inbox. Free for your convenience.