To get Apparel, Cases, Stickers, Wall Art and Home Decor delivered by the holidays, order today.

Follow My Nose

Lisa G. Putman

Joined November 2007

  • Available
    Products
    9
  • Artist
    Notes
  • Artwork Comments 9

Wall Art

Home Decor

Bags

Stationery

Artist's Description

Toco Toucan
Canon EOS 30D DSLR

The Toco Toucan is at home in South America’s tropical forests but recognized everywhere. The toucan’s oversized, colorful bill has made it one of the world’s most popular birds.

The 7.5-inch-long (19-centimeter-long) bill may be seen as a desirable mating trait, but if so, it is one that both male and female toucans possess. In fact, both sexes use their bills to catch tasty morsels and pitch them to one another during a mating ritual fruit toss.

As a weapon, the bill is a bit more show than substance. It is a honeycomb of bone that actually contains a lot of air. While its size may deter predators, it is of little use in combating them.

But the toucan’s bill is useful as a feeding tool. The birds use them to reach fruit on branches that are too small to support their weight, and also to skin their pickings. In addition to fruit, Toco toucans eat insects and, sometimes, young birds, eggs, or lizards.

Toco toucans live in small flocks of about six birds. Their bright colors actually provide good camouflage in the dappled light of the rain forest canopy. However, the birds commonly keep up a racket of vocalization, which suggests that they are not trying to remain hidden.

Toucans nest in tree holes. They usually have two to four eggs each year, which both parents care for. Young toucans do not have a large bill at birth—it grows as they develop and does not become full size for several months.

These iconic birds are very popular pets, and many are captured to supply demand for this trade. They are also familiar commercial mascots known for hawking stout, cereal, and other products. Indigenous peoples regard the bird with a more sacred eye; they are traditionally seen as conduits between the worlds of the living and the spirits.

Average lifespan in the wild: Up to 20 years
Size: Body, 25 in (63.5 cm); Bill, 7.5 in (19 cm)
Weight: 20 oz (550 g)
Group name: Flock

Toucan Sam Trivia:

Toucan Sam is the avian mascot of Froot Loops cereal. The character is a blue cartoon toucan with a striped beak. Although his beak originally had two pink stripes, during the 1970s it became a tradition that each stripe on his beak represented one of the flavors of the pieces in the cereal: (red = cherry, yellow = lemon, orange = orange).1 The additions of new colors have made this color scheme no longer accurate. There are now seven colors of this cereal. The first new color was green, which was introduced in 1991. After that came purple in 1994, then blue in 1997. The newest color, gold, was introduced in 2006.

The colors perhaps represent different flavors present in the cereal, but each color has the same flavor.2

Biologically speaking, Toucan Sam appears to be a Keel-billed Toucan. Keel-billed Toucans are well-known for their colorful beaks and propensity for fruit in their diets, two features which are very consistent with the character.

In commercials featuring Toucan Sam, he exhibits the ability to smell out Froot Loops from great distances. He invariably locates a concealed bowl or box of the cereal while intoning, “follow my nose! It always knows!” Sometimes followed by “the flavor of fruit! wherever it grows!”

Artwork Comments

  • kathy s gillentine
  • photoclimber
  • kalaryder
  • Auntymazza
  • Bobby McLeod
  • dc witmer
  • Johnny P
  • Aleksandar Topalovic
  • Tamara  Kenneally
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

10% off

for joining the Redbubble mailing list

Receive exclusive deals and awesome artist news and content right to your inbox. Free for your convenience.