Tacking Point Lighthouse, Port Macquarie

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$53.50
Get this by Dec 24

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TonyCrehan

Hobart, Australia

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Sizing Information

Small 12.0" x 7.8"
Medium 18.0" x 11.7"
Large 24.0" x 15.7"
X large 30.0" x 19.6"

Features

  • Each print is individually stretched and constructed for your order
  • Epson pigment inks using Giclée inkjets to ensure a long life
  • UV protection provided by a clear lacquer
  • Cotton/poly blend Canson canvas for brighter whites and even stretching

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Artist's Description

Featured in PostCards Destinations http://www.redbubble.com/groups/postcard-destinations on 02/18/12

Featured in All About Lighthouses http://www.redbubble.com/groups/all-about-lighthouses Group on 03/12/12

Featured in A Place To Call Home http://www.redbubble.com/groups/a-place-to-call-home Group on 06/17/14

Featured in Emergency Services http://www.redbubble.com/groups/emergency-services-group-art Group on 11/23/14

Tacking Point Lighthouse is Australia’s third oldest lighthouse. It was built on a rocky headland about 8 kilometres south of Port Macquarie in 1879 by Shepard and Mortley, to a design by the New South Wales Colonial Architect, James Barnet. It is operated by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority and is classified by the National Trust of Australia (NSW).

Tacking Point was named by explorer Matthew Flinders in 1802 during his 1802–1803 circumnavigation of Australia.

In the mid-nineteenth century, there were few lights in the Tacking Point area and over 20 ships were wrecked. The first wrecks occurred in 1823 and were the schooner Black Joe and the steamer Sumatra. Consequently, in 1879, a fixed catadioptric light of less than 1000 candelas was erected on Tacking Point. It was the fourth of five small navigational lighthouses built to a design by James Barnet.

The lighthouse was built of cement-rendered bricks and only needed to be 8 metres high due to the elevation of the site. In 1919, the light was converted from wick oil light to automatic acetylene operation, and was demanned in 1920. The light was converted to mains electricity in 1974.

Taken with Pentax k-r on 2 February 2012 at Port Macquarie.
Lens Pentax-DA 18-55mm F3.5-5.6
ISO 200
24.4mm
0 EV
f/11
1/160 sec.
RAW
Hand held

Minor adjustments to lighting in PSE9.

Artwork Comments

  • AngieDavies
  • TonyCrehan
  • Warren  Patten
  • TonyCrehan
  • Catherine Hamilton-Veal  ©
  • TonyCrehan
  • Audrey Clarke
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  • bazcelt
  • TonyCrehan
  • Audrey Clarke
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  • vaggypar
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  • Evita
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  • Andrew Prince
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  • PhotosByG
  • TonyCrehan
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