FOR MY SISTER 2

Canvas Prints

Size:
$57.95
Tammera

Sacramento, United States

Sizing Information

Small 10.7" x 8.0"
Medium 16.1" x 12.0"
Large 21.5" x 16.0"
X large 26.9" x 20.0"

Features

  • Each print is individually stretched and constructed for your order
  • Epson pigment inks using Giclée inkjets to ensure a long life
  • UV protection provided by a clear lacquer
  • Cotton/poly blend Canson canvas for brighter whites and even stretching

Reviews

Artist's Description

This work is done for my sister and in memory of her dearest love, husband and friend who passed away recently.

The poem was used for his memorial service.

Do not stand at my grave and weep
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Do not stand at my grave and weep is a poem written in 1932 by Mary Elizabeth Frye. Although the origin of the poem was disputed until later in her life, Mary Frye’s authorship was confirmed in 1998 after research by Abigail Van Buren, a newspaper columnist.

The “definitive version,” as published by The Times and The Sunday Times in Frye’s obituary, 5 November 2004:

Do not stand at my grave and weep, I am not there; I do not sleep. I am a thousand winds that blow, I am the diamond glints on snow, I am the sun on ripened grain, I am the gentle autumn rain. When you awaken in the morning’s hush I am the swift uplifting rush Of quiet birds in circling flight. I am the soft star-shine at night. Do not stand at my grave and cry, I am not there; I did not die.

Origins
Mary Frye, who was living in Baltimore at the time, wrote the poem in 1932. She had never written any poetry, but the plight of a young German Jewish woman, Margaret Schwarzkopf, who was staying with her and her husband, inspired the poem. She wrote it down on a brown paper shopping bag. Margaret Schwarzkopf had been concerned about her mother, who was ill in Germany, but she had been warned not to return home because of increasing anti-Semitic unrest. When her mother died, the heartbroken young woman told Frye that she never had the chance to “stand by my mother’s grave and shed a tear”. Frye found herself composing a piece of verse on a brown paper shopping bag. Later she said that the words “just came to her” and expressed what she felt about life and death. Mary Frye circulated the poem privately. Because she never published or copyrighted it, there is no definitive version. She wrote other poems, but this, her first, endured. Her obituary in The Times made it clear that she was the author of the famous poem, which has been recited at funerals and on other appropriate occasions around the world for eighty years.

The poem was introduced to many in Britain when it was read by the father of a soldier killed by a bomb in Northern Ireland. The soldier’s father read the poem on BBC radio in 1995 in remembrance of his son, having been left it in an envelope addressed ‘To all my loved ones’ in his personal effects. The authorship of the poem was established a few years later after an investigation by journalist Abigail Van Buren. There is a short illustrated book of the poem sometimes to be found in small-town bookshops with ink drawings for each line that includes this story in the inside dustjacket, written before the authorship was confirmed and therefore stating that the authorship is unknown.

Digital Art
Photoshop CS5

Special Thanx to deviantart.com Stock:
Cherry_Tree_Flower_Blossom_2_by_Enchantedgal_Stock.jpg

Artwork Comments

  • Norma-jean Morrison
  • Tammera
  • Julie  White
  • Tammera
  • Lorelle Gromus
  • Tammera
  • maggie326
  • Tammera
  • © Karin Taylor
  • Tammera
  • eoconnor
  • Tammera
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