Nine Common Daisies Isolated on A Black Background

iPhone Cases & Skins

Model:
$25.00
taiche

Ula, Turkey

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  • Available
    Products
    29
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  • Comments 4

Specifications

  • Material

    Slim fitting one-piece clip-on case
    Protective Lip Weight Thickness
    Yes 15g 3/8"
  • Material

    Clip-on case with a unique inner silicon absorbing sleeve
    Protective Lip Weight Thickness
    Yes 30g 7/16"
  • Material

    Custom cut removable vinyl decal
    Protective Lip Weight Thickness
    No < 5g < 1/32"

Features

  • Custom cut to fit your phone
  • 3M Controltac removable vinyl decal
  • Air bubble grooves and a laminate top coat
  • Scratch resistant backing
  • Slim fitting one-piece clip-on case
  • Allows full access to all device ports
  • Extremely durable, shatterproof casing
  • Long life, super-bright colors embedded directly into the case
  • Clip-on case with a unique inner silicon absorbing sleeve
  • Allows full access to all device ports
  • Extremely durable, shatterproof casing
  • Long life, super-bright colors embedded directly into the case

Reviews

Artist's Description

The modest, unassuming beauty of the daisy has a playful, childlike character that brings joy and happiness wherever it arrives. The many colored options of the daisy provide ample opportunity to match this lovely flower to a specific personality. No other flower can match the daisy for pure joy.
The daisy signifies innocence, I’ll never tell, purity, love that conquers all. The daisy is also associated with the fifth wedding anniversary
for my full range of Daisies Wild Gifts, Novelties and Collectables
Click the links to see all of my Redbubble Common Daisy Paintings, Common Daisy Photography, Common Daisy Greeting Cards, Common Daisy Stickers, Common Daisy Tees,, Common Daisy iPhone Cases and Common Daisy iPads.

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Daisy
The daisy’s name comes from the Anglo-Saxon “daes eage,” or “day’s eye,” which refers to the way the flower opens and closes with the sun. The daisy is knows as a symbol of childhood innocence and is said to originate from a Dryad who presided over forests, meadows, and pastures. Roman mythological legend tells us that the nymph Belides, as she danced with the other nymphs at the edge of the forest, caught the eye of Vertumnus, the god of the orchards. To escape his unwanted attention, she transformed herself into the flower bellis, which is the daisy’s botanical name.

Daisies are often confused with chrysanthemums. The daisy continue to be associated with simplicity and modesty, characteristics carried down from the Victorian era. Heartbroken Victorian young women who wished to be loved once again by their suitors began a custom using the daisy, that is still in use today. In Victorian times is was a young maiden would pluck a daisy’s petals one by one and sing, “He loves me, he loves me not,” for each petal pulled. The last petal so plucked predicted the future of such love.

Young girls might also pick a handful of daisies with eyes closed. The number of blossoms in hand told of the number of years remaining until marriage. Its simplicity has made the daisy a favorite of many poets. Its healing and predictive powers made it popular not only with farmers, but also with an infamous English king. Spring, medieval farmers would say, would not arrive until one could set a foot on twelve daisies. To dream of daisies in springtime or summer was a lucky omen, but dreams of them in fall or winter meant certain doom. Transplanting wild daisies to a cultivated garden was considered to be very unlucky. King Henry VIII ate dishes of daisies to relieve himself from his stomach-ulcer pain. For then, it was also believed that drinking crushed daisies steeped in wine, in small doses over a period of fifteen could cure insanity.

The message that daisies bring are of innocence, purity, and gentleness on behalf of both the giver and the receiver. The daisy’s message is, “You have as many virtues as this plant has petals,” or, “I will consider your request.” A white daisy symbolizes a common feeling of affection, and a red daisy tells of beauty unknown to the possessor.

Artwork Comments

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