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Little wood fairies  by steppeland

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Brakelbos before the bluebells
Belgium, Brakel, Vlaamse Ardennen (Flemish Ardennes)

Description

Common wood sorrel Wikipedia (Lat. Oxalis acetosella , Dutch Witte Klaverzuring )

Quotes Wikipedia:
Common Wood-sorrel is a plant from the genus Oxalis, common in most of Europe and parts of Asia. The binomial name is Oxalis acetosella, because of its sour taste. In much of its range it is the only member of its genus and hence simply known as “the” wood-sorrel.
The plant has heart-shaped leaves, folded through the middle, that occur in groups of three atop a reddish brown stalk. It flowers for a few months during the spring, with small white flowers with pink streaks. Red or violet flowers also occur rarely.During the night or when it rains both flowers and leaves contract.

Use – Wood sorrel has been eaten by humans for millennia. In Dr. James Duke’s “Handbook of Edible Weeds,” he notes that the Kiowa Indian tribe chewed wood sorrel to alleviate thirst on long trips, that the Potawatomi Indians cooked it with sugar to make a dessert, the Algonquin Indians considered it an aphrodisiac, the Cherokee tribe ate wood sorrel to alleviate mouth sores and a sore throat, and the Iroquois ate wood sorrel to help with cramps, fever and nausea. Wood sorrel, like spinach and broccoli, contains oxalic acid which is considered slightly toxic because it interferes with food digestion and the absorption of some trace minerals. However, the U.S. National Institutes of Health have determined that the negative effects of oxalic acid are generally of little or no nutritional consequence in persons who eat a variety of foods. An oxalate called “sal acetosella” was formerly extracted from the plant, through boiling.


(ID request – Solved!)
(Clover like leaves, but the white purple-veined flowers with their redbrown flower stem don’t look like a clover at all…
Any help with identifying these fragile spring flowers would be much appreciated!)

Thanks a lot to Carla Wick/Jandelle Petters For the help with identifying these pretty little flowers!


Brakelbos, Belgium, Vlaamse Ardennen

We were just a little early this year, to visit Brakelbos (Brakel Woods) in the Flemish Ardennes (Belgium) – The bluebells, that use to cover the ground of this beautiful beeches-wood were not flowering yet. Only the friendly white flowers of the wood anemone, (also called windflower or thimbleweed Wikipedia ) and some other less notable spring flowers were decorating the woods floor already.

Hopefully in a months time, we’ll be back (and not too late) for the bluebells too :)


Photograph made with Pentax K10D camera and
Tamron AF70-300mm Tele-macro1:2 lens
Exposure 1/90 sec, f. unknown
focal length 180 mm , ISO 200
Date: March 27, 2011

TAGS : Belgium, Brakel, Brakelbos, nature, woods, forest, flowers, fragile, white, purple veined, green, brown, seasons, spring


See more
See more of my Early spring collection
See more of my woods photography

You can now also search my portfolio using
Steppeland Thematic Catalogue


Comments and feed-back always welcome. Thanks for looking :)
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Tags

belgium brakel brakelbos, nature woods forest, flowers, fragile white purple_veined, green brown, seasons spring early_spring, steppeland nof, blur dof bokeh, two 2, macro close_up

Steppeland (pseudonym) is a Flemish photographer, living in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Her main area’s of interest are Nature Photography, Street photography and Photojournalism. Recently she also explores different digital art techniques, mainly based on her own photographs.
More of her work can be seen at DeviantArt and 500px


Comments and feed-back always welcome! Thanks for looking!

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Comments

  • steppeland
    steppelandover 3 years ago

  • Carla Wick/Jandelle Petters
    Carla Wick/Jan...over 3 years ago

    Maybe a type of Sorrel?

  • Oh, typical, I had thought about that too, Carla, but in when I looked for it the first time, i didn’t find any sorrel type that came even close to this. But my second search just now did bring me further… wood-sorrels (oxalis) wikipedia – that must be it! – Will do a little more digging to figure out the specific species… but we’re close for sure! Thank you so much!

    – steppeland

  • Common wood sorrel wikipedia – that must be it! Big thanks, Carla!

    – steppeland

  • artfulvistas
    artfulvistasover 3 years ago

    DElicate and pretty!! Nice!!

  • Thank you so much, Lynda, for your visit and kind comment! Much appreciated.

    – steppeland

  • Carla Wick/Jandelle Petters
    Carla Wick/Jan...over 3 years ago

    oh awesome…glad we got an answer! my computer is VERY slow right now for some reason so haven’t been able to do much browsing to help. Glad it was enuf to help you get the answer :o)

  • Yes, me too! For fungi, I can stand it when I don’t know the species – there are just a lot I don’t know – But for our local wild flowers, I have to know! LOL –
    Thanks once again, dear!

    – steppeland

  • Ray Clarke
    Ray Clarkeover 3 years ago

  • Thank you, Ray!

    – steppeland

  • kalaryder
    kalaryder4 months ago

    Very delicate

  • Thank you, kalaryder! :D

    – steppeland

  • kalaryder
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