Meet the A-Line Dress. All about all-over printing.

Vintage Turquoise Tea Cup

Framed Prints

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$94.50
Get this by Dec 24

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© Sophie W. Smith

Joined October 2012

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  • Artwork Comments 7

Sizing Information

Small 10.9" x 8.0"
Medium 16.4" x 12.0"
Large 21.8" x 16.0"
Note: Image size. Matboard and frame increase size of final product

Features

  • Custom-made box or flat frame styles
  • High-quality timber frame finishes to suit your decor
  • Premium Perspex - clearer and lighter than glass
  • Exhibition quality box or flat frame styles

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Artist's Description

Feature #39 > March 8th, 2013 Journal Entry
Feature #166 > June 13th, 2013 Journal Entry


A teacup is a small cup, with or without a handle, generally a small one that may be grasped with the thumb and one or two fingers. In some lands it is custom to raise the last finger on the hand, or “pinkie” when drinking from a tea cup. It is typically made of a ceramic material. It is usually part of a set, composed of a cup and a matching saucer. These in turn may be part of a tea set in combination with a teapot, cream jug, covered sugar bowl and slop bowl en suite. Teacups are wider and shorter than coffee cups, but not always.

Some collectors acquire numerous one-of-a-kind cups with matching saucers. Better teacups typically are of fine white translucent porcelain and can be decorated with floral patterns. They may also memorialize a location, person, or event. Such collectors may also accumulate silver teaspoons. These usually have a decorated enamel insert in the handle with similar themes.

The first small cups specifically made for drinking the new beverage tea seen in Europe were exported from the Japanese port of Imari. Tea bowls in the Far East did not have handles, and the first European imitations, made at Meissen, were without handles, too. Countries in East Africa like Eritrea also use the handle-less cups to drink boon which is traditional coffee there.

Chinese teacups are very small, normally can hold no more than 30ml of liquid. They are designed to be used with Yixing teapots or Gaiwan.

Artwork Comments

desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

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