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Grumman OV-1 Mohawk by Walter Colvin

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3d Fine art render of a Grumman OV-1 Mohawk.

The Grumman OV-1 Mohawk is an armed military observation and attack aircraft, designed for battlefield surveillance and light strike capabilities. It is of twin turboprop configuration, and carried two crew members with side by side seating. The Mohawk was intended to operate from short, unimproved runways in support of United States Army maneuver forces.

The Mohawk began as a joint Army-Marine program through the then-Navy Bureau of Aeronautics (BuAer), for an observation/attack plane that would outperform the Cessna L-19 Bird Dog. In June 1956, the Army issued Type Specificationn TS145, which called for the development and procurement of a two-seat, twin turboprop aircraft designed to operate from small, unimproved fields under all weather conditions. It would be faster, with greater firepower, and heavier armour than the Bird Dog, which had proved vulnerable during the Korean War. The Mohawk’s mission would include observation, artillery spotting, air control, emergency resupply, naval target spotting, liaison, and radiological monitoring. The Navy specified that the aircraft must be capable of operating from small “jeep” escort class carriers (CVEs). The DoD selected Grumman Aircraft Corporation’s G-134 design as the winner of the competition in 1957. Marine requirements contributed an unusual feature to the design. As originally proposed, the OF-1 could be fitted with water skis that would allow the aircraft to land at sea and taxi to island beaches at 20 kts. Since the Marines were authorized to operate fixed wing aircraft in the close air support (CAS) role, the mockup also featured underwing pylons for rockets, bombs, and other stores.

The Air Force did not like the armament capability of the Mohawk and tried to get it removed. The Marines did not want the sophisticated sensors the Army wanted, so when their Navy sponsors opted to buy a fleet oil tanker, they dropped from the program. The Army continued with armed Mohawks and developed cargo pods that could be dropped from underwing hard points to resupply troops in emergencies.

The radar imaging capability of the Mohawk was to prove a significant advance in both peace and war. The SLAR could look through foliage and map terrain, presenting the observer with a film image of the earth below only minutes after the area was scanned. In military operations, the image was split in two parts, one showing fixed terrain features, the other spotting moving targets.

The prototype (YAO-1AF) first flew on April 14, 1959. The OV-1 entered production in October 1959.

In mid-1961, the first Mohawks to serve with U.S. forces overseas were delivered to the 7th Army at Sandhofen Airfield near Mannheim, Germany. Before its formal acceptance, the camera-carrying AO-1AF was flown by Ralph Donnell on a tour of 29 European airfields to show it off before the U.S. Army field commanders and potential European customers. In addition to their Vietnam and European service, SLAR-equipped Mohawks began operational missions in 1963 patrolling the Korean Demilitarized Zone. Germany and France shown early interest in the Mohawk, and Grumman actually signed a license production agreement with the French manufacturer Breguet Aviation in exchange for American rights to the Atlantic maritime patrol aircraft.

The very nature of the joint Army/Marine program had forced design compromises, such as ejection seats, that made the aircraft an expensive and, sometimes, openly resisted item in Army budgets. Orders for the OV-1 stopped in Fiscal 1964, and the controversy in the Pentagon over the armed Mohawk peaked with a 1965 directive that prohibited the Army from operating armed fixed wing aircraft. Operational success in Vietnam led to additional Mohawk orders in 1966, and by 1968, five surveillance companies were operating in Southeast Asia.

Comments

  • JRGarland
    JRGarlandalmost 2 years ago

    Awesome capture!!!

  • Thank you John.

    – Walter Colvin

  • Steven  Agius
    Steven Agiusalmost 2 years ago

    Great work Walter.

  • THank you Steven.

    – Walter Colvin

  • Edward Denyer
    Edward Denyeralmost 2 years ago

    Great Image Walter. – Ted

  • Thank you Ted.

    – Walter Colvin

  • Colin J Williams Photography
    Colin J Willia...almost 2 years ago

    This is superb work !! – Colin

  • Thank you Colin.

    – Walter Colvin

  • Keith Reesor
    Keith Reesoralmost 2 years ago

    Very cool Walter!! Always so informative as well!! :)

  • Thank you very much Keith.

    – Walter Colvin

  • canonman99
    canonman99almost 2 years ago

    great as usual

  • Keith Reesor
    Keith Reesoralmost 2 years ago

    Walter,

    3-23-2013 :)

  • Thank you my friend.

    – Walter Colvin

  • Carol and Mike Werner
    Carol and Mike...almost 2 years ago

    Nice work, Walter . . . congrats on the Bryce and Beyond feature!

  • Thank you very much Carol and Mike.

    – Walter Colvin

  • jewelskings
    jewelskingsalmost 2 years ago


  • Thank you very much.

    – Walter Colvin

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