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Lest We Forget - Anzac War Memorial Hyde Park Sydney - The HDR Experience

Philip Johnson

Newport Beach, Australia

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Dedicated to the fallen

They went with songs to the battle, they were young.
Straight of limb, true of eyes, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.
They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them

The “Ode of Remembrance” is an ode taken from Laurence Binyon’s “For the Fallen”, which was first published in The Times in September 1914.

The poet wrote For the Fallen while sitting on the cliffs between Pentire Point and The Rumps in north Cornwall, UK. A stone plaque was erected at the spot in 2001 to commemorate the fact. The plaque bears the inscription

For The Fallen
Composed on these cliffs 1914

The seven-verse poem honoured the World War I British war dead of that time and in particular the British Expeditionary Force, which had by then already had high casualty rates on the developing Western Front. The poem was published when the Battle of the Marne was foremost in people’s minds.

Over time, the third and fourth verses of the poem (although often just the fourth) were claimed as a tribute to all casualties of war, regardless of nation.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young.
Straight of limb, true of eyes, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.
They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

The line Lest we forget is often added to the end of the ode, which is repeated in response by those listening. In Australia, Canada and New Zealand (and often in the United Kingdom), the final line of the ode, “We will remember them”, is repeated in response.

The “Ode of Remembrance” is regularly recited at memorial services held on days commemorating World War I, such as ANZAC Day, Remembrance Day, and Remembrance Sunday (Remembrance Sunday is the second Sunday of November, the Sunday nearest to 11 November (Remembrance Day), which is the anniversary of the end of the hostilities of the First World War at 11 a.m. in 1918). In Australia’s Returned and Services Leagues, it is read out nightly at 6 p.m., followed by a minute’s silence. In New Zealand it is part of the Dawn service at 6 a.m. Recitations of the “Ode of Remembrance” are often followed by a playing of the Last Post. In Canadian remembrance services, a French translation is often used along with or instead of the English ode.

“They shall grow not old…” was set to music by Douglas Guest in 1971, and has become a well-known feature of choral services on Remembrance Sunday.

Equipment:: Nikon D300 Nikon 18-200mm lens, Handheld

Technique: HDR 5 Bracketted Images, Photomatix 3.26 64 Bit

Artwork Comments

  • GailD
  • Philip Johnson
  • Linda Bianic
  • Rick  Friedle
  • TimSouter
  • Philip Johnson
  • Mrswillow
  • DonDavisUK
  • Tibby Steedly
  • Tom Gomez
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  • billfox256
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