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Dunorlan Fountain

Dave Godden

Maidstone, United Kingdom

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Artist's Description

The Fountain, Dunorlan Park, Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent.

5 exposure HDR from single RAW file shot on a Canon EOS1000D with ND8 filter and processed in PS8.

This is one of the stand-out features of the park and has been a major focus for the restoration efforts. The splendid fountain is adorned with dolphins, water nymphs and classical figures and is constructed out of Pulhamite and terracotta.

The fountain was designed and built by the Pulham family, with high quality terracotta and Pulhamite (an artificial stone invented by the family) furniture a major aspect of their work. They became renowned for their work winning several medals and exhibiting at the Great Exhibition of 1862. One of the two works exhibited there was the upper section of what is now Dunorlan Fountain. Originally called the Hebe Fountain (due to the image of Hebe – daughter of Zeus, at the top) James Pullham II received recommendation for the architectural decoration in terracotta. The fountain is shown clearly in the image from the Dunorlan Sales Brochure, with Hebe atop the central column and four kneeling Triton figures around the base. These details were long absent from the fountain, believed to have been used as target practice by the service men occupying the house during World War II, succumbing to the same fate as the statues that lined the avenue. However, the restoration project has completely renovated the fountain to return it to its former glory.

The fountain was a major focus of the restoration project and a new statue of Hebe was built in terracotta by specialist sculptors. While dismantling the fountain for repair other sections and figures were found in need of replacement. The four Triton figures on the outer edge of the fountain; spraying water back into the bottom pond, were not replaced for fear they would be easily damaged. The restoration won a Civic Trust Award for the restoration.

Artwork Comments

desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait
desktop tablet-landscape content-width tablet-portrait workstream-4-across phone-landscape phone-portrait

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