Careful with that car, Eugene by Uwe Rothuysen

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Careful with that car, Eugene by 


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Porsche 917 014 / 029
1971 Spa 1000 km : second place, Drivers Siffert / Bell.
First place Porsche 917 015 / 035, Drivers Rodriguez / Oliver.
Fourth place Porsche 917, Drivers Kauhsen / Jöst.
Third place, I don’t know, it doesn’t matter.
Porsche 917 it’s simply the racing car of the century, unbeatable since the 1970s years. The CanAm series had to change the rules to stop this car.
Unforgettable Steve Mc Queen in the best movie about motor racing: “LeMans” (indeed much better than “Grand Prix”).


Comments

  • Jos van de venne
    Jos van de venneover 4 years ago

    Sehr gut Uwe!!

  • Thank you kindly Jos! Much appreciated.

    – Uwe Rothuysen

  • oulgundog
    oulgundogover 4 years ago

    Nice one Uwe, I’m with on the Steve Mcqueen!!

  • Many thanks Steven! I appreciate your comments!
    Thanks for the fave too:-)

    – Uwe Rothuysen

  • barkeypf
    barkeypfover 4 years ago

    Nice post work Uwe. Are you saying this car still wins today?

  • Thanks a whole lot Paul!
    I say yes, but the rules have changed. Please have a look at Wikipedia:
    “The 917/30 was the most powerful sports car racer ever built and raced. The 5.374 litre 12 cylinder (90.0 × 70.4 mm) twin-turbocharged engine could produce 1,580 bhp (1,180 kW) in qualifying tune, with twin turbochargers run up to full boost, a simply astonishing 39 psi (2.7 bar), though it usually raced with around 1,100 bhp (820 kW) at 7,800 rpm to preserve the engine. Whilst weighing only in at 1800 lb (816 kg), giving it a power to weight of 1967.36 bhp/tonne in qualifying tune and 1369.68 bhp/tonne in race tune. The 917/30 dominated the Can-Am series during the 1973 season. The 917/30 could go from 0-62 mph (100 km/h) in 1.9 seconds, 0-100 mph (160 km/h) in 3.9 seconds, 0-200 mph (320 km/h) in 10.9 seconds, and on to a top speed of more than 260 mph (420 km/h). These staggering levels of performance, the attendant fuel consumption of the engines, and ever increasing risk, has led to the 917/30 sometimes being cited as the car that killed Can-Am racing.”

    – Uwe Rothuysen

  • WildBillPho
    WildBillPhoover 4 years ago

    Great shot Uwe! Did you take this back in the day?

  • Thank you very much Bill!
    I’ve captured by daylight. For the sinister look I’ve used a texture in different blending modes with the use of add layer masks to reduce the effect.
    Thanks for the fave too:-)

    – Uwe Rothuysen

  • Steve Mezardjian
    Steve Mezardjianover 4 years ago

    Very cool shot of a venerable racing legend Uwe!

  • Thanks a whole lot Steve!
    Please have a look at Wikipedia:
    “The 917/30 was the most powerful sports car racer ever built and raced. The 5.374 litre 12 cylinder (90.0 × 70.4 mm) twin-turbocharged engine could produce 1,580 bhp (1,180 kW) in qualifying tune, with twin turbochargers run up to full boost, a simply astonishing 39 psi (2.7 bar), though it usually raced with around 1,100 bhp (820 kW) at 7,800 rpm to preserve the engine. Whilst weighing only in at 1800 lb (816 kg), giving it a power to weight of 1967.36 bhp/tonne in qualifying tune and 1369.68 bhp/tonne in race tune. The 917/30 dominated the Can-Am series during the 1973 season. The 917/30 could go from 0-62 mph (100 km/h) in 1.9 seconds, 0-100 mph (160 km/h) in 3.9 seconds, 0-200 mph (320 km/h) in 10.9 seconds, and on to a top speed of more than 260 mph (420 km/h). These staggering levels of performance, the attendant fuel consumption of the engines, and ever increasing risk, has led to the 917/30 sometimes being cited as the car that killed Can-Am racing.”

    – Uwe Rothuysen

  • Stuart Row
    Stuart Rowover 4 years ago

    Looks like a toy when you see people around it. Hugely successful, but also one of the best looking racecars of all time. Just can’t get enough photos of them. Great capture.

  • Thanks a whole lot Stuart!
    Please have a look at Wikipedia:
    “The 917/30 was the most powerful sports car racer ever built and raced. The 5.374 litre 12 cylinder (90.0 × 70.4 mm) twin-turbocharged engine could produce 1,580 bhp (1,180 kW) in qualifying tune, with twin turbochargers run up to full boost, a simply astonishing 39 psi (2.7 bar), though it usually raced with around 1,100 bhp (820 kW) at 7,800 rpm to preserve the engine. Whilst weighing only in at 1800 lb (816 kg), giving it a power to weight of 1967.36 bhp/tonne in qualifying tune and 1369.68 bhp/tonne in race tune. The 917/30 dominated the Can-Am series during the 1973 season. The 917/30 could go from 0-62 mph (100 km/h) in 1.9 seconds, 0-100 mph (160 km/h) in 3.9 seconds, 0-200 mph (320 km/h) in 10.9 seconds, and on to a top speed of more than 260 mph (420 km/h). These staggering levels of performance, the attendant fuel consumption of the engines, and ever increasing risk, has led to the 917/30 sometimes being cited as the car that killed Can-Am racing.”

    – Uwe Rothuysen

  • Steve Mezardjian
    Steve Mezardjianover 4 years ago

    I agree Uwe. It certainly was the ultimate weapon of it’s day! There really hasn’t been another race car to equal or best it since then.

  • Paul Woloschuk
    Paul Woloschukover 4 years ago

    Great work Uwe.
    Please submit this image to the Thoroughbred Sports Cars Group

  • Thank you Paul!
    And please apologize for being so late.
    I accept your invitation with pleasure. Usually this car was driven by one driver, but it’s theoretically possible to take a co-driver with you.

    – Uwe Rothuysen

  • casperbee
    casperbeeabout 4 years ago

    Agree – great capture of legendary vehicle.

  • Hello casperbee, thanks so much for stopping by and leaving such generous comments.Thanks for the fave too:-)

    – Uwe Rothuysen

  • J.K. York
    J.K. Yorkabout 4 years ago

    a true thoroughbred racer. did they build this specifically to beat the Ford GT40 Le Mans champ 1966-69? i would argue that Frankenheimer’s “Grand Prix” is a better made film though.

  • Thank you very much James! I’ve both films on my shelf and wouldn’t like to miss them.

    – Uwe Rothuysen


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