Celtic Cowboy Boots

redqueenself

San Antonio, United States

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Artist's Description


Celtic Cowboy Boots Tshirt on Zazzle
You would think that living in Texas there would be at least one pair of cowboy boots in my house…Nope!
9″×11″ pencil and ink drawing on sketchbook paper
How Irish Cowboys Tamed The West

Celtic Cowboy Boots on Zazzle

Cowboy Boots

When mounting and, especially, dismounting, the slick, treadless leather sole of the boot allowed easy insertion and removal of the foot into the stirrup of the Western saddle. The original toe was rounded and a bit narrowed at the toe to make it easier to insert. While an extremely pointed toe is a modern stylization appearing in the 1940s, it adds no practical benefit, and can be uncomfortable in a working boot.

While in the saddle, the tall heel minimized the risk of the foot sliding forward through the stirrup, which could be life-threatening if it happened and the rider were to be unseated. There was often considerable risk that a cowboy would fall from a horse, both because he often had to ride young, unpredictable horses, but also because he had to do challenging ranch work in difficult terrain, that often meant that he could accidentally become unseated by a quick-moving horse. If a rider fell from a horse but had a boot get caught in the stirrup, there arose a very great risk that the horse could panic and run off, dragging the cowboy, causing severe injury and possible death.

The tall leather shaft of the boot helped to hold the boot in place in the absence of lacing. The tall shaft, comfortably loose fit, and lack of lacing all were additional features that helped prevent a cowboy from being dragged since his body weight could pull his foot out of the boot if he fell off while the boot remained stuck in the stirrup. While mounted, the shaft also protected the lower leg and ankle from rubbing on the stirrup leathers, as well as fending off brush and thorns, particularly if also worn with chaps or chinks. While dismounted, the shaft helped protect the leg and foot from rocks, brush, thorns, and rattlesnakes. In wet weather or creek crossings, the high tops helped prevent the boot from filling with mud and water.

Artwork Comments

  • BLYTHART
  • redqueenself
  • JRGarland
  • Raymond Kerr
  • Sandro Vivolo
  • GEORGE SANDERSON
  • Sherryll  Johnson
  • paintingsheep
  • inkedsandra
  • Rosemaree
  • WesternArt
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