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*´¯`♥ღTURKEYS WORKING DOWN NEAR THE BARN BABY TURKEYS PLAYING*´¯`♥ღ by ✿✿ Bonita ✿✿ ђєℓℓσ
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*´¯`♥ღTURKEYS WORKING DOWN NEAR THE BARN BABY TURKEYS PLAYING*´¯`♥ღ by 


65 VIEWS TY HUGS

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SEEN AN OLD BARN IN WIKI AND THOUGHT ID LIKE TO DO SOMETHING WITH IT WHICH I DID..DONE SOME EFFECT AND COLOUR ADDING MY TURKEYS AND ADDING BABY TURKEYS,,ADDING IN CAPTURES OF TOOLS,HOE,HAMMER,PITCH FORK IN MAKING THIS FUN PICTURE VIA PHOTOSHOP LAYERS

TURKEY STOCK

TURKEY BIRD STOCK

BARN STOCK WIKI
BABY TURKEY

INFO FROM WIKIPEDIA

A turkey is a large bird in the genus Meleagris. One species, Meleagris gallopavo (commonly known as the Wild Turkey) is native to the forests of North America. The domestic turkey is a descendant of this species. The other living species is Meleagris ocellata or the Ocellated Turkey, native to the forests of the Yucatán Peninsula.1

Turkeys are classed in the taxonomic order of Galliformes. Within this order they are relatives of the grouse family or subfamily. Males of both species have a distinctive fleshy wattle or protuberance that hangs from the top of the beak (called a snood in the Wild Turkey and its domestic descendants). They are among the largest birds in their ranges. As in many galliformes, the male (tom or gobbler) is larger and much more colorful than the female (hen). A baby turkey is known as a poult. Genus Meleagris is the only genus in the subfamily Meleagridinae, formerly known as the family Meleagrididae, but now subsumed within the family Phasianidae.

When Europeans first encountered turkeys in America, they incorrectly identified the birds as a type of guineafowl (Numididae). Guinea-fowl were also known as turkey fowl (or turkey hen and turkey cock) because they were imported to Central Europe through Turkey. The name turkey fowl, shortened to just the name of the country, stuck as the name of the North American bird.234 In 1550, English navigator William Strickland, who had introduced the turkey into England, was granted a coat of arms including a “turkey-cock in his pride proper”.5

The confusion between these kinds of birds from related but different families is also reflected in the scientific name for the turkey genus: meleagris (μελεαγρίς) is Greek for guineafowl. Two major reasons why the name ‘turkey fowl’ stuck to Meleagris rather than to the Helmeted Guineafowl (Numida meleagris) were the genuine belief that the newly discovered America was in fact a part of Asia, and the tendency during that time to attribute exotic animals and foods to places that symbolized far-off, exotic lands.

In many countries, the name for turkeys has a different derivation (see List of names for the Wild Turkey).

Several other birds, which are sometimes called turkeys, are not particularly closely related: the Australian Brushturkey is a megapode, and the bird sometimes known as the “Australian Turkey” is the Australian Bustard, a gruiform. The Anhinga (Anhinga rufa) is sometimes called the Water Turkey, from the shape of its tail when the feathers are fully spread for drying.

Male Ocellated Turkey, Meleagris ocellata

A number of turkeys have been described from fossils. The Meleagridinae are known from the Early Miocene (c. 23 mya) onwards, with the extinct genera Rhegminornis (Early Miocene of Bell, U.S.) and Proagriocharis (Kimball Late Miocene/Early Pliocene of Lime Creek, U.S.). The former is probably a basal turkey, the other a more contemporary bird not very similar to known turkeys; both were much smaller birds. A turkey fossil not assignable to genus but similar to Meleagris is known from the Late Miocene of Westmoreland County, Virginia.1 In the modern genus Meleagris, a considerable number of species have been described, as turkey fossils are robust and fairly often found, and turkeys show great variation among individuals. Many of these supposed fossilized species are now considered junior synonyms. One, the well-documented California Turkey Meleagris californica,6 became extinct recently enough to have been hunted by early human settlers.7 It is believed its demise was due to the combined pressures of climate change at the end of the last glacial period and hunting

Comments

  • ✿✿ Bonita ✿✿ ђєℓℓσ
    ✿✿ Bonita ✿✿ ђ...about 1 year ago

  • ✿✿ Bonita ✿✿ ђєℓℓσ
    ✿✿ Bonita ✿✿ ђ...about 1 year ago

  • missmoneypenny
    missmoneypennyabout 1 year ago

    Nice layering

  • Thank you for your visit and kind comment happy u like this fun picture hugs ty

    – ✿✿ Bonita ✿✿ ђєℓℓσ

  • Ana Belaj
    Ana Belajabout 1 year ago

    Fantastic work!

  • Thank you for your visit and kind comment happy u like this fun picture hugs ty

    – ✿✿ Bonita ✿✿ ђєℓℓσ

  • BlueMoonRose
    BlueMoonRoseabout 1 year ago

    Beautifully done!

  • Thank you for your visit and kind comment happy u like this fun picture hugs

    – ✿✿ Bonita ✿✿ ђєℓℓσ

  • Sandra Foster
    Sandra Fosterabout 1 year ago

    Bonita, you had fun with this one. I like that rustic old barn. A fave.

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