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Stood wobbling on a table and breaking my neck and back to capture this rather large moth* perched on the ceiling, illuminated by the light fitting. Unfolded, the wings revealed one large ‘eye’ on each of the hind wings and a smaller eye on the forward wings.

*This “moth” is actually a BUTTERFLY, thanks to InkedSandra :)

Nikon S640; ISO 400, 1/160s, f2.7 macro
CS5, own layers and textures plus one from Cat-tails

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Original image:

Tags

insect, butterfly, lepidoptera, nymphalidae, wings, spots

…yep, another camera junkie

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Comments

  • annacuypers
    annacuypersover 3 years ago

    Superb image, love the warm tones, x

  • thanks a bundle anna! x

    – carol brandt

  • anne reeskamp
    anne reeskampover 3 years ago

    your ‘common moth’ found the right photographer : Beautiful !!! Lovely tones ! :))

  • wot a lovely thing to say anne :))

    – carol brandt

  • © Kira Bodensted
    © Kira Bodenstedover 3 years ago

    This is anything but common. Stunning shot, great colors and everything…but I can’t figure out where the rest of the legs are..and the 2 legs cast shadow in opposite directions
    ..spooky but in a good way :o)

  • Thanks Kira. I know what you mean about the ‘missing’ legs – they are there behind the wings (see original shot which I’ve now also posted). I even thought about faking a leg to make him look more bona fide. But guess what, not only does he look like some legs are missing, some legs ARE missing! On checking the other shots I did of this moth at the same time, I saw he’s only got FOUR legs.
    A quick check with wiki about this family: Nymphalidae: …the front pair of legs in the male are reduced in size and functionally impotent; in some the atrophy of the forelegs is considerable. In many forms of subfamilies the fore legs are kept pressed against the underside of the thorax and in the male are often very inconspicuous.
    Well you learn something every day.
    BTW the length of the flouro explains the double shadow where the moth was in the middle of the light. :)

    – carol brandt

  • SRana
    SRanaover 3 years ago

    i love the designs on the wing, you’ve captured it so well Carol, great work

  • thanks a million shane :)

    – carol brandt

  • ArtX
    ArtXover 3 years ago

    original and well presented . compliments carol

  • cheers ArtX

    – carol brandt

  • Stuart Chapman
    Stuart Chapmanover 3 years ago

    Fantastic detail and so beautifully processed. Fabulously done, the original image just shows what’s gone on.

  • thanks for a great comment and compliment stuart :)

    – carol brandt

  • AndyGii
    AndyGiiover 3 years ago

    Fabulous work Carol. But is it really nice to call it common…it may just be a little less fortunate than others LOL

  • feels a bit mean doesn’t it

    – carol brandt

  • Edge-of-dreams
    Edge-of-dreamsover 3 years ago

    Gorgeous image, but looks like a butterfly to me. Maybe a good idea to take it outside.

  • there are some pretty good-looking moths around… this one was BIG… when I looked for it the next morning it was gone – thank you for your comment eod :)

    – carol brandt

  • jockey
    jockeyover 3 years ago

    Exceptional work, great photo too start with, and enhanced by some very good texture work.

  • appreciate your thoughtful comment bill :)

    – carol brandt

  • Mike Oxley
    Mike Oxleyover 3 years ago

    What beautiful work, Carol. A great find and capture with marvellous processing. Very effective, indeed. Shame about the wee chap being “functionally impotent”, though. Oh, sorry. It’s his legs that are…..

  • yeh! :P

    – carol brandt

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